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I have a program that uses fork() to create child processes, and I want to have the children communicate back to the parent process using Unix pipes.

The problem is that multiple pipes don't seem to be created, or maybe there's a problem with my array. When I used prinf() in the parent program it reads identical data from every pipe, even though each child sends different data.

Here is my code:

// Variables
int pipes_count = 0;
int *pipes[MAXCLIENTS];
int new_pipefd[2];
int pipe_bytes;
char pipe_buffer[MAXDATASIZE];

while(1) {
    // Pipe creation 
    pipe(new_pipefd);
    pipes[pipes_count] = new_pipefd;
    pipes_count++;

    if (fork()) {
        // unrelated code for parent here
        close(new_pipefd[1]); // close the parent's write-end of the pipe
        break;
    } else {
        // unrelated code for child here
        close(new_pipefd[0]); // close the child's read-end of the pipe
        break;
    }

    if (some condition) { break; } // The parent will stop creating pipes
}

while(condition that guarantees this is the child) {
    write(new_pipefd[1], buffer, strlen(recv_buffer));
    close(new_pipefd[1]);
    return 0; // the child process ends
}

// This is a loop where the parent reads what the children sent
for (int i = 0; i < pipes_count; i++) {
    pipe_bytes = read(pipes[i][0], pipe_buffer, sizeof pipe_buffer);
    if (pipe_bytes == 0) {
        close(pipes[i][0]); 
    } else {
        printf("Testing: %s\n", pipe_buffer);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You can't do array assignments like pipes[pipes_count] = new_pipefd; in C. You need to check the return value from fork() to know whether the code is the parent or the child. With the code shown, we can't tell what you're really up to; there's mention of a loop, but it really matters what you're up to. The child processes will apparently end up executing the parent's code after they've done the child's code. Please post more of your real code — there are so many things that could be going wrong it is rather hard to guess what problems you've got. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 16 '14 at 2:31
    
How could I get an array of pipes (file descriptors) then? I removed the code that checks the return value from fork() from this post for simplicity, I should have made the comments clearer. Having code run in parent vs. child works fine in my actual source. Edit: Just saw your edit. I'll go back and try to make everything clearer. – John Apr 16 '14 at 2:35
    
I take it back; your pipes is an array of int *, not int; my bad. However, your code seems to copy the pointer new_pipefd into each position in the array, which isn't going to help much. You need to be able to store different values. Since you've not shown all the code, we can't tell whether you got this right but haven't shown it. On the face of it, though, everything is going to be reading from the last child. You need the parent process to close the write ends of the pipes. In fact, in general, with piping, many problems are caused by not closing enough file descriptors. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 16 '14 at 2:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As I noted in my comments, the problem is in the assignment pipes[pipes_count] = new_pipefd; at:

int pipes_count = 0;
int *pipes[MAXCLIENTS];
int new_pipefd[2];
int pipe_bytes;
char pipe_buffer[MAXDATASIZE];

while(1) {
    // Pipe creation 
    pipe(new_pipefd);
    pipes[pipes_count] = new_pipefd;
    pipes_count++;

The trouble is that the variable new_pipefd is an array, so you're copying the address of the same array into each of the elements of pipes, which means that the parent only has access to the last pipe that was created.

I think you should be using code more like:

int pipes_count = 0;
int pipes[MAXCLIENTS];  // Changed type!
int new_pipefd[2];
char pipe_buffer[MAXDATASIZE];

while (1)
{
    // Pipe creation 
    pipe(new_pipefd);
    pipes[pipes_count++] = new_pipefd[0];  // Just the read end of the pipe

    if (fork())
    {
        // unrelated code for parent here
        close(new_pipefd[1]); // close the parent's write-end of the pipe
        // break;             // This break is not wanted
    }
    else
    {
        // unrelated code for child here
        close(new_pipefd[0]); // close the child's read-end of the pipe
        break;
    }

    if (some condition)
        break;        // The parent will stop creating pipes
}

while (condition that guarantees this is the child)
{
    write(new_pipefd[1], buffer, strlen(recv_buffer));
    close(new_pipefd[1]);
    return 0; // the child process ends
}

// This is a loop where the parent reads what the children sent
for (int i = 0; i < pipes_count; i++) {
    int pipe_bytes = read(pipes[i], pipe_buffer, sizeof(pipe_buffer));
    if (pipe_bytes != 0)
        printf("Testing: %.*s\n", pipe_bytes, pipe_buffer); // Safe!
    close(pipes[i]); 
}

Were it my code, I'd have a function (which I traditionally call be_childish()) to invoke in the 'if it is a child' block of code in the loop. The function would never return, and would be passed whatever resources it needs (new_pipefd for sure, maybe other information too). I often have a function be_parental() to do the parental activities. I find this cleans up most of the code, forcing clean separation of the activities.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jonathan!! – John Apr 16 '14 at 23:55

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