Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to align label/value pairs in the center using CSS without using absolute positioning or tables (see screen shot). In that screen shot I positioned the value (ie. $4,500/wk) absolute and then floated the label right up against it. But absolute doesn't work so well in IE and I've heard it's not a good technique.

But how can I acheive this effect where the labels are all justified right without absolute?

alt text

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Yi Jiang, Octavian Damiean, Pops, user7116, John Saunders May 26 '11 at 19:21

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
The comment below has a point. Thsi is tabular data, why not use tables? –  Douglas Mayle Oct 23 '08 at 19:11
    
While it's true it can be viewed as tabular data, the visual display (2 sets of key=>value pairs) makes it awkward in terms of accessibility if it were a table. You can also view it as a list of keys and values that happens to be displayed in 2 columns... so using CSS to position is also a solution. –  Rahul Oct 23 '08 at 19:31
    
(Of course, you could make two tables and float them next to each other. That would work too.) –  Rahul Oct 23 '08 at 19:32
add comment

9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'm confused, what's tabular about that data? Where are the records? Rows of different fields do not really make a table in the traditional sense. (Nor hacking it to have two records per row for that matter)

If we're entertaining this idea, then what's the difference between the left half of the table and the right? What would the column headings be if there were any?

I prefer the definition list suggestion, it's definitely a better fit than a table. And you wouldn't need two columns if all the DTs and DDs were float:left and width:25%, and in the following order: Cost, Pets, Sleeps, Smoking, etc... Therefore you can use 1 definition list, as it really ought to be.

Although you will probably need a clear:left on every other DT just in case the content of any of these elements wraps over two lines.

<style>
    dl
    {
    	float:left;
    	width:100%;
    }
    dt,
    dd
    {
    	float:left;
    	width:24%;
    	margin:0;
    	padding:0;
    }
    dt
    {
    	text-align:right;
    	padding-right:.33em;
    }
    dd
    {
    	text-align:left;
    }
</style>
<dl>
    <dt>Cost:</dt>
    <dd>$4,500/wk</dd>
    <dt>Pets:</dt>
    <dd>No</dd>
    <dt>Sleeps:</dt>
    <dd>1</dd>
    <dt>Smoking:</dt>
    <dd>No</dd>
</dl>
share|improve this answer
    
Tables don't always need column headings as sometimes you can use row headings instead - you just need to remember to set the scope="row|column" attribute. –  Ian Oxley Oct 24 '08 at 12:32
    
Thanks, that proves how wrong it would be to use a table. As "Cost" in the example, is neither a heading for the row or the column. Just half the row! How is that going to make sense to a screen reader? –  Lee Kowalkowski Oct 24 '08 at 20:02
add comment

If you're showing tabular data there's no shame in using a table.

share|improve this answer
    
In this case, putting the text in the table is even beneficial, because it is the title of the table, therefore is the "header" of the table. The other categories are too, but it putting it in adds semantic value. –  cdeszaq Oct 23 '08 at 19:14
    
This isn't tabular data. That's not to say that a table is necessarily inappropriate, but this is a set of label/value pairs, not a table with rows and columns. –  Herb Caudill Oct 23 '08 at 21:32
add comment

Use fixed width divs with the CSS text-align property. Don't forget to float your divs left.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Let's say you're using DL, DT and DD:

<dl>
<dt>Cost:</dt>
<dd>$4,500/wk</dd>
<dt>Sleeps:</dt>
<dd>1</dd>
</dl>

You can use the following approximate CSS (untested):

dl { width: 200px; }
dt { width: 100px; text-align: right; float: left; clear: both; }
dd { width: 100px; margin: 0; float: left; }

Edit: As Chris Marasti-Georg pointed out:

Additionally, if you want 2 columns, use 2 definition lists, and float them

share|improve this answer
    
Additionally, if you want 2 columns, use 2 definition lists, and float them. –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 23 '08 at 19:26
    
Thanks for the nod! thumbs up I like this answer best. –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 23 '08 at 19:40
add comment

@jon is right, if its tabular data, you can use a table. However, if you really don't want to use a table, I think this is what you want:

CSS

.label {
  min-width: 20%;
  text-align: right;
  float: left;
}

HTML

<div class="pair">
  <div class="label">Cost</div>
  <div class="value">$4,500/wk</div>
</div>
<div class="pair">
  <div class="label">Sleeps</div>
  <div class="value">1</div>
</div>
<div class="pair">
  <div class="label">Bedrooms</div>
  <div class="value">9</div>
</div>

EDIT @Chris Marasti-Georg points out that definition lists would be more appropriate here. I agree, but I guess I wanted to show that the same can be easily done with any block-level element, and there is nothing in the default styling of definition lists that is needed to accomplish this goal.

share|improve this answer
    
Why fake a definition list when one exists? –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 23 '08 at 19:25
    
good question. Definition lists would be more appropriate here. I will update to make note of that. –  pkaeding Oct 23 '08 at 19:29
    
As I've noted in a similar question, I just don't agree that this is semantically a definition list. It's a set of label/value pairs, for which there is not a standard HTML element. Neither definition lists, divs, nor tables are intrinsically more appropriate to this context. –  Herb Caudill Oct 23 '08 at 19:50
add comment

Expanding on Rahul's post:

CSS

#list { width: 450px; }
#left { float: left; background: lightgreen; }
#right { float: right; background: lightblue; }
dl { width: 225px; }
dt { width: 100px; text-align: right; float: left; clear: both; }
dd { width: 100px; margin: 0; float: left; padding-left: 5px; }

HTML

<div id="list">
    <dl id="left">
    	<dt>Cost:</dt>
    	<dd>$4,500/wk</dd>
    	<dt>Sleeps:</dt>
    	<dd>1</dd>
    	<dt>Bedrooms:</dt>
    	<dd>9</dd>
    	<dt>Baths:</dt>
    	<dd>6</dd>
    </dl>
    <dl id="right">
    	<dt>Pets:</dt>
    	<dd>No</dd>
    	<dt>Smoking:</dt>
    	<dd>No</dd>
    	<dt>Pool:</dt>
    	<dd>No</dd>
    	<dt>Waterfront:</dt>
    	<dd>No</dd>
    </dl>
</div>

I tested this under FF 3.0.1, IE6 and IE7. The background color is simply there to help you visualize where the columns start and end.

share|improve this answer
    
Using @pkaeding's approach, you don't need to split this up arbitrarily into two dls. Just float the .pair element left and give it width 50% and you'll get the two-column effect for free. –  Herb Caudill Oct 23 '08 at 19:52
add comment

How about using a table to layout the table and then using CSS to position that table wherever you want on your page?

share|improve this answer
add comment

A quick note on implementing this using tables, there are several constructs that will make this plenty accessible. The simplest of which would simple to be to use TH for the labels and TD for the values. This site has a nice discussion, and goes deeper into things like headers for cells, etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I've always treated definition lists as to be used for definitions of items, not for key/value pairs. (9 is not a definition of 'bedrooms'). However, this particular construct (lists of key/value pairs) has been causing arguments for years as there is no native semantic markup which reflects it properly.

Go for a DL if you're not anal about what a definition is. Or go for a table. A table with key/value pairs in rows, if the header/cell scope is set correctly, is perfectly valid. I've been doing this recently, and it does seem to be the most semantically accurate representation.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.