Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have three models with inheritance and relationship and I want to cache query to this models.

class Person(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'person'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(100), nullable=False)
    type = Column(String(50))
    __mapper_args__ = {
        'polymorphic_identity': 'object',
        'polymorphic_on': type
        }

class Man(Person):
    __tablename__ = 'man'
    id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('person.id'), primary_key=True)
    age = Column(String(100), nullable=False)
    __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_identity': 'man'}

class Config(Base):
    __tablename__ = "config"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    person = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('person.id'))
    address = Column(String)
    person_ref = relationship(Person)

There are a lot of others models inherited from Personal. For example I need to get access to Man attributes through Config relationship. Normally I would do:

config = session.query(Config).join(Config.person_ref).filter(Person.type == 'man').first()
print config.person_ref.age

How can I cache query like this with dogpile? I can cache query to Config, but I can't cache query to attributes of Man, emits SQL every time. I tried to use with_polymorphic, but it's only works without joinedload. (don't undestand why)

config = session.query(Config).options(FromCache("default")).first()
people = session.query(Person).options(FromCache("default")).with_polymorphic('*').get(config.person)

but I need joinedload to filter for types.

share|improve this question
    
define "can't". Stack trace? no results? emits SQL every time? not clear. –  zzzeek Apr 19 at 23:04
    
Emits SQL every time. –  aborilov Apr 20 at 3:32
    
not sure then, you need to look at the cache keys that are being generated when the query is being called. Use pdb.set_trace() to step through what's happening. Caching is not simple which is why this isn't a built-in feature; by having it as a recipe it's to encourage users to step through it. –  zzzeek Apr 20 at 15:31
    
@zzzeek How do you think it should work? When I use joined, it join only Person table and when I try to access Man attributes, SQL emit, because attributes of inherited object lazy loaded. –  aborilov Apr 21 at 5:40
    
if you want the lazy-loaded attributes to be cached, your two options are 1. use joinedload() or 2. use the RelationshipCache feature that's also illustrated in the dogpile example. –  zzzeek Apr 21 at 14:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

in order to ensure that the "man" table is loaded, of_type() can be used for any pattern of subtypes. We can instead join to a full polymorphic selectable using with_polymorphic(). See the examples at http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/latest/orm/inheritance.html#creating-joins-to-specific-subtypes for details on this. As long as the data you want comes out in one SELECT query, then that data will be within what is cached via FromCache. It's true that the caching recipe does not currently include a system by which the deferred load of additional joined inheritance attributes can be cached after the fact.

from sqlalchemy import *
from sqlalchemy.orm import *
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from examples.dogpile_caching.caching_query import query_callable, FromCache, RelationshipCache
from hashlib import md5
from dogpile.cache.region import make_region

Base = declarative_base()

class Person(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'person'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(100), nullable=False)
    type = Column(String(50))
    __mapper_args__ = {
        'polymorphic_identity': 'object',
        'polymorphic_on': type
        }

class Man(Person):
    __tablename__ = 'man'
    id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('person.id'), primary_key=True)
    age = Column(String(100), nullable=False)
    __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_identity': 'man'}

class SomethingElse(Person):
    __tablename__ = 'somethingelse'

    id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('person.id'), primary_key=True)
    age = Column(String(100), nullable=False)
    __mapper_args__ = {'polymorphic_identity': 'somethingelse'}

class Config(Base):
    __tablename__ = "config"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    person = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('person.id'))
    address = Column(String)
    person_ref = relationship(Person)

e = create_engine("sqlite://", echo=True)
Base.metadata.create_all(e)

def md5_key_mangler(key):
    """Receive cache keys as long concatenated strings;
    distill them into an md5 hash.

    """
    return md5(key.encode('ascii')).hexdigest()

regions = {}
regions['default'] = make_region(
            key_mangler=md5_key_mangler
            ).configure(
                'dogpile.cache.memory_pickle',
            )

Session = scoped_session(
                sessionmaker(
                    bind=e,
                    query_cls=query_callable(regions)
                )
            )

sess = Session()
sess.add(Config(person_ref=SomethingElse(age='45', name='se1')))
sess.add(Config(person_ref=Man(age='30', name='man1')))
sess.commit()

all_types = with_polymorphic(Person, "*", aliased=True)

conf = sess.query(Config).options(joinedload(Config.person_ref.of_type(all_types)), FromCache("default")).first()
sess.commit()
sess.close()

print "_____NO MORE SQL!___________"


conf = sess.query(Config).options(joinedload(Config.person_ref.of_type(all_types)), FromCache("default")).first()
print conf.person_ref.age
share|improve this answer
    
as I undestand I can't cache query like this man = session.query(Config).options(joinedload(Config.person_ref)).filter(Person.type == 'man').first(). As I said in question, I have a lot of objects inherits from Person and I have to do with_polymorphic('*'), that's not good I think. –  aborilov Apr 22 at 7:26
    
that query does not make sense. you are querying only for Config, not Person, so you can't filter on Person.type like that - it will produce a cartesian product. the joinedload() is a separate aspect of the query, please read docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/latest/orm/…. the example and documentation above illustrates the correct approaches to joinedload objects limiting to a certain type. –  zzzeek Apr 22 at 20:27
    
Sorry, my bad. Query is session.query(Config).join(Config.person_ref).options(joinedload(Config.person_‌​ref)).filter(Person.type == 'man').first() and I can cache it with FromCache, but if I access to attributes of Man new SQL emits. In real app I didn't event filter by type, I filter by some of Config attributes and print out all attributes of person_ref (I don't know it type). Only solution that I see is to use with_polymorphic('*'). Can you tell my where I wrong? –  aborilov Apr 23 at 12:17
    
of_type() works with with_polymorphic. see updated example –  zzzeek Apr 23 at 23:08
    
yes, its works, but if you do sess.commit() before sess.close() like I do, sql SELECT somethingelse.id AS somethingelse_id, person.id AS person_id, person.name AS person_name, person.type AS person_type, somethingelse.age AS somethingelse_age FROM person JOIN somethingelse ON person.id = somethingelse.id WHERE person.id = ? 2014-04-24 11:03:23,975 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine (1,) emits. I also have to expunge all objects in CachingQuery.__iter__ as describes in the doc of method. –  aborilov Apr 24 at 7:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.