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I have a file that looks something like this:

for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
  for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
       for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
     for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
           for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)

I want it to look like this (remove indentations):

for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)

How can this be done (using sed maybe?)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted
sed "s/^[ \t]*//" -i youfile

Warning: this will overwrite the original file.

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thanks @shuvalov. –  Lazer Feb 23 '10 at 7:52
    
FWIW, I couldn't get this (or anything similar) working on OS X Mavericks, now when I needed it. Running "perl -pe '<regexp>'" worked fine, though. I even tried adding the -E parameter to sed, which didn't help. –  Per Lundberg Nov 14 '13 at 6:58
1  
I can confirm that the sed on OS X Mavericks is broken w.r.t. every other unix-like OS. It does not appear to allow matching of any escaped character inside character classes. –  Chris Warth Apr 10 at 18:56
    
You may install gsed on OS X. –  Wei Qiu Jul 31 at 11:44

For this specific problem, something like this would work:

$ sed 's/^ *//g' < input.txt > output.txt

It says to replace all spaces at the start of a line with nothing. If you also want to remove tabs, change it to this:

$ sed 's/^[ \t]+//g' < input.txt > output.txt

The leading "s" before the / means "substitute". The /'s are the delimiters for the patterns. The data between the first two /'s are the pattern to match, and the data between the second and third / is the data to replace it with. In this case you're replacing it with nothing. The "g" after the final slash means to do it "globally", ie: over the entire file rather than on only the first match it finds.

Finally, instead of < input.txt > output.txt you can use the -i option which means to edit the file "in place". Meaning, you don't need to create a second file to contain your result. If you use this option you will lose your original file.

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Indentation might be done with tabs... –  Joao da Silva Feb 22 '10 at 11:48
    
@João da Silva: I modified my answer to reflect that. Thanks for the comment. –  Bryan Oakley Feb 22 '10 at 12:04
    
thanks for explaining. –  Lazer Feb 23 '10 at 7:50

you can use awk

$ awk '{$1=$1}1' file
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)

sed

$ sed 's|^[[:blank:]]*||g' file
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)

shell's while/read loop

while read -r line
do
    echo $line
done <"file"
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thanks @ghostdog74! –  Lazer Feb 23 '10 at 7:50
    
Your sed example worked for me where answers to other similar questions did not work. Thanks! –  2rs2ts Jun 10 '13 at 21:35
    
@ghostdog74 what is this kinda of expression ([[:blank:]]) called? I saw another example where people used [[:space:]] to remove leading whitespaces. Besides, blank, space, what other words can be used here? I just want to understand this usage. Thanks! –  olala Feb 24 at 17:18

Here you go:

user@host:~$ sed 's/^[\t ]*//g' < file-in.txt

Or:

user@host:~$ sed 's/^[\t ]*//g' < file-in.txt > file-out.txt
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it will be shorter with -i(in-place) arg –  shuvalov Feb 22 '10 at 11:49
    
thanks @João da Silva. –  Lazer Feb 23 '10 at 7:53

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