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The code is below:

-module(map_demo).
-export([count_characters/1]).

count_characters(Str) ->
count_characters(Str, #{}).

count_characters([H|T], #{ H => N } = X) ->
    count_characters(T, X#{ H := N+1 });
count_characters([H|T], X) ->
    count_characters(T, X#{ H => 1});
count_characters([], X) ->
    X.

when compiling the code in the Erlang shell, it reported the following errors:

1> c(map_demo).
map_demo.erl:7: illegal pattern
map_demo.erl:8: variable 'N' is unbound
map_demo.erl:10: illegal use of variable 'H' in map
map_demo.erl:7: Warning: variable 'H' is unused
error

I'm new in Erlang, and just can't find anything wrong by myself. How to correct it?

share|improve this question
1  
The closest thing I can find around is that this is a "known bug". Are these erlang people serious? This is such a huge bug in that case! I think this is something you took from "Programming Erlang" by Joe Armstrong himself, and I am shocked to the very core that this doesn't work! –  Navneeth Gopalakrishnan Nov 28 '14 at 6:47

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The answers from IRC (#erlang@freenode):

  1. variables as keys in matches are not supported yet (release 17.0)
  2. A more general issue affects matching arguments of a function: line 7's H is matched 2 times; or once and used to match N then. (This issue also appears with binaries)

This should be solved in the coming releases.

share|improve this answer
    
Since (1) is the case, what is the correct way to write this code using maps in 17.0? –  JDong Jan 1 at 22:10

@EWit, Felipe Mafra:

maps does just what it is supposed to do; what's missing here is the reduce part:

count(Str) -> M = count_chars(Str, maps:new()), % maps part, bad naming
    L = maps:to_list(M),                        % to be able to sum
    N = [X || {_,X} <- L],                      % strip the numbers
    lists:sum(N).                               % sum them up

count_chars([H|T], Map) when is_map(Map)->
    N = maps:get(H, Map, 0),
    count_chars(T, maps:put(H, N + 1, Map));
count_chars([], Map) -> Map.
share|improve this answer

Problem in match syntax.

Fof match use :=. Example

test(#{ key := Test }) -> Test.

And for associated key and value use =>. Example: M = #{ keynew => 123 }

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So, how to correct the code? I just tried your method. But it doesn't work. –  geeker Apr 16 '14 at 10:58
    
Sorry, i skiped one moment. If you use map, key is not varible, need use as #{ key => Value }. –  saa Apr 16 '14 at 12:02

When you want to match a map, you need like this:

#{key1 := Pattern1, key2 := Pattern2, ...} = VarContainingAMap.

you can read the ducoment: http://joearms.github.io/2014/02/01/big-changes-to-erlang.html

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I guess you are using R17 since this feature is available only from this version.

looking at some doc, my understanding is that you should write the code that way (I can't test it, I am still using R15 :o)

-module(map_demo).
-export([count_characters/1]).

count_characters(Str) ->
count_characters(Str, #{}).

count_characters([H|T], #{ H := N } = X) ->
    count_characters(T, X#{ H := N+1 });
count_characters([H|T], X) ->
    count_characters(T, X#{ H => 1});
count_characters([], X) ->
    X.
share|improve this answer

Quoted from OTP 17.0 Release Notes:

OTP-11616 == erts stdlib hipe dialyzer compiler typer ==

    EEP43: New data type - Maps

    With Maps you may for instance:

    -- M0 = #{ a => 1, b => 2}, % create associations

    -- M1 = M0#{ a := 10 }, % update values

    -- M2 = M1#{ "hi" => "hello"}, % add new associations

    -- #{ "hi" := V1, a := V2, b := V3} = M2. % match keys with
    values

    For information on how to use Maps please see the Reference
    Manual.

    The current implementation is without the following features:

    -- No variable keys

    -- No single value access

    -- No map comprehensions

    Note that Maps is experimental during OTP 17.0.

Currently you can use maps module to implement count_characters:

count_characters(Str) ->
    count_characters(Str, #{}).

count_characters([H|T], X) -> 
    count_characters(T, maps:put(H, maps:get(H, X, 0) + 1, X));
count_characters([], X) ->
    X.
share|improve this answer

-module(count_chars).

%% API

-export([count/1]).

count(Str) -> count_chars(Str, maps:new()).

count_chars([H|T], Map) when is_map(Map)->

N = maps:get(H, Map, 0),
count_chars(T, maps:put(H, N + 1, Map));

count_chars([], Map) -> Map.

share|improve this answer
    
Please elaborate on what was changed to make this answer function properly. Just giving code does not assist in clarifying what was wrong in the first place. –  EWit Dec 18 '14 at 22:23

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