Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please see the following lines of code mentioned below:

byte[] a = { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
byte[] b = a; // b will have all values of a.
a = null; 

In C# byte[] is a reference type. Now if a = null in line 3, then why b is not null since its a reference type. If we check b it will still have all values of a.

share|improve this question
1  
because you set null reference to the a while b is still referencing byte array –  Fedor Apr 16 '14 at 11:23
3  
@EhsanSajjad byte[] is a reference type –  Sriram Sakthivel Apr 16 '14 at 11:26
1  
Note that every array is a reference type, even if its members are value types. Reference: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/t63sy5hs.aspx –  sharpstudent Apr 16 '14 at 11:28
1  
elaborate please @HassanNisar –  Ehsan Sajjad Apr 16 '14 at 11:30
2  
@EhsanSajjad Just look at the documentation for Array and note that it is a public abstract class –  Magnus Apr 16 '14 at 11:32

6 Answers 6

First you create an array somewhere in the memory, for example starting at address 1000. a is a reference, it does not contain the array, it contains the address 1000. b also contains this address. In line 3 you change a to point to null instead, but b is still pointing at the array in address 1000.

You edited the reference (a), you did not edit the object it referenced to ({1,2,3,4}).

share|improve this answer
    
good explanation but you can improve it with diagrams –  Ehsan Sajjad Apr 16 '14 at 11:38

That's actually how reference types works.

As you said, byte[] is a reference type like all other arrays. Let's analyze your sample line by line;

byte[] a = { 1, 2, 3, 4 };

--> You created a byte array in memory and a is a reference that array.

enter image description here

byte[] b = a;

--> Your b is referencing the same object with a which is { 1, 2, 3, 4 } but they are different references.

enter image description here

a = null;

--> Your a is not referencing anywhere in the memory but that doesn't effect b.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
Ah! Pretty pictures. –  Kami Apr 16 '14 at 11:34
    
I know I know.. I'm terrible at paint. –  Soner Gönül Apr 16 '14 at 11:34
    
+1 for last 2 edits –  sharpstudent Apr 16 '14 at 11:39

Your question makes the assumption that when you make the assignment:

byte[] b = a;

And that you're making some sort of graph association like so:

b -> a -> { 1, 2, 3, 4 }

And when you make the assignment of a to null, you impact the value of b, because:

b -> a -> null

But that's not how copying references work. When you copy the reference, you really make a copy of the reference that a has, like so:

a ----> { 1, 2, 3, 4 }
              ^
b ------------|

This is why when you make the assignment of a to null, you don't impact the value of b, just a:

a ----> null      { 1, 2, 3, 4 }
                          ^
b ------------------------|

share|improve this answer

You are making b point to the memory address that contains the byte array. Then afterwards, you are making a point to null. b remains unchanged.

share|improve this answer

A reference type variable points to a value. When you assign one ref type variable to another you copy reference to its value not to the variable itself. This is why b still points to a table of values.

share|improve this answer

When a type is a value type, it means that the variables of this type store the actual data. When a type is a reference type, it means that the variables of this type store a reference to the actual data.

In both cases, assignment from one variable to another copies the content of the variable. For value types, this means that the value is copied from one variable to the other, duplicating the actual data and thus creating a new object. For reference types, this means that the reference is copied from one variable to the other, duplicating the reference but leaving the actual data intact. To stress that: the object isn't copied, but the reference is. The two copies of the reference are independent, even though it's easy to observe that they point to the same object when dereferenced.

From these you can easily see that the assignment from one variable to the other copies the reference to the byte array, so you have two references to the byte array. Afterwards, when you assign null to one of the variables, you are copying a null reference to it, overwriting the original reference (which was stored in that variable) to the byte array. So, now you don't have two references to the byte array, but only one again - the object is the same, but the references to it are independent.

(Similarly, if you reassign the byte array back to the nulled variable, it doesn't mean that all variables in your program that pointed to null will point to the byte array - only the one you assigned will.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.