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I'd like a loop that uses a UInt16 (ushort) to loop through all of its values. However, this doesn't do it:

for( ushort i = 0; i < UInt16.MaxValue; i++ )
{
    // do something
}

The problem is that the loop will quit when i == 0xFFFF and not "do something". If I change the 'for' statement to "for(ushort i = 0; i <= UInt16.MaxValue; i++ )", then it becomes an infinite loop because i never gets to 0x10000 because ushorts only go to 0xFFFF.

I could make 'i' an int and cast it or assign it to a ushort variable in the loop.

Any suggestions?

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do you have to count up? –  warren Oct 23 '08 at 19:42
    
you have the same issue counting down –  Ferruccio Oct 23 '08 at 20:23
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5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Use a do...while loop

ushort i = 0;
do
{
    // do something
} while(i++ < UInt16.MaxValue);

There is an interesting discussion of testing loops at the top vs. the bottom here.

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That's the ticket! –  rpj Oct 23 '08 at 19:28
    
Much nicer than my answer. :) –  Jeff Yates Oct 23 '08 at 19:31
    
That's brilliant, yet disturbing somehow ;-) –  Ferruccio Oct 23 '08 at 19:34
    
extremely disturbing; i'm about to remove my answwer as I made a goof, but counting down would work too, yes? like for(ushort i=UInt16.MaxValue; i>=0; i--) –  warren Oct 23 '08 at 19:39
    
Nope, sorry warren. Since i is unsigned, it would never be less than 0. You'd still want a do...while. –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 23 '08 at 19:48
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UInt16.MaxValue evaluates to 0xffff, not 0x10000. I think you can do this with a do/while loop, as a variation on burkhard1979's answer.

ushort i = 0;
do {
   ...
} while (++i != 0);
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I prefer this answer. Much more fun! –  Paul Hargreaves Oct 23 '08 at 20:36
    
The != 0 is redundant. But this method is the sort of thing I use. Integer overflow ftw! –  Artelius Nov 9 '08 at 23:33
    
True. I'm a little used to C#, which doesn't implicitly convert int to bool like C/C++ does. –  spoulson Nov 10 '08 at 13:15
    
Since it is tagged C# I think it would not work without the !=0 –  Burkhard Apr 20 '10 at 14:44
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You could simply replace the for by a do-while loop.

ushort i = 0;
do
{
i++;
...
} while(i!=UInt16.MaxValue);
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does it have to be a short? why not just

for(int i = 0;i<=0xFFFF;i++)
{
  //do whatever
}
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Assuming that your code suffers from an off by one error (the current code, stops just before having the final value evaluated. Then the following might answer you.

Very simple, as your counter is a 16 bit unsigned integer, it can not have values bigger than 0xffff, as that value is still valid, you need to have some value that extends beyond that as the guard. However adding 1 to 0xffff in 16 bits just wraps around to 0. As suggested, either use a do while loop (that does not need a guard value), or use a larger value to contain your counter.

ps. Using 16 bit variables on modern machines is actually less efficient than using 32 bit variables as no overflow code needs to be generated.

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