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I'm currently brushing up on my coding skills and working through some easy problems I've found online. The particular task is to input a txt file that contains any number of lines, and to have the program check each line and return "True" or "False" depending on whether that line contains all 26 letters of the alphabet. I feel like I'm almost finished, but my regular expression to match the string to [a-z] returns false no matter what I do. I've tried changing the string to lowercase, removing spaces, and nothing seems to work.

Here's a link to the project as well.

The text I have in my text file currently is "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog."

package easy139;


import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;


public class easy139 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            Scanner in = new Scanner(new FileReader("input.txt"));
            while (in.hasNextLine()) {
                String line = in.nextLine();
                System.out.println(line);
                String noSpaces = line.replaceAll(" ","");
                if (noSpaces.matches("[a-z]")) {
                    System.out.println("True");
                }
                else {
                    System.out.println("False");
                }
            }
            in.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
        }
    }
}
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2  
Can you even do that with an efficient and not ridiculously long regex ? –  dystroy Apr 16 at 13:06
2  
That's not the correct approach. [a-z] stands for "one character contained in the a-z range (so basically, a letter)". [a-z]{26} would stand for "26 letters", without any constraint on which letters. You'll have to find another way ! –  Robin Apr 16 at 13:08
    
That's what I was thinking too. I tried replacing ["a-z"] with ["abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"] and got the same results. I've never used a regular expression before so I'm not quite sure what I'm trying is correct. –  Fluke Apr 16 at 13:11
    
You could "sort" the string and then use a regex (i.e. a+b+...), but I don't see any direct solution using a regex and certainly the fastest one wouldn't be regex based here. –  dystroy Apr 16 at 13:12
1  
Dystroy, do you think using a for loop that iterated through each letter of the alphabet and checked the string for an instance of each letter would be a better way to approach this? –  Fluke Apr 16 at 13:14

4 Answers 4

Your test is returning false because the regex [a-z] means "exactly one letter".

A regex that works with String.matches() is:

(?i)(?=.*a)(?=.*b)(?=.*c)...(?=.*z).*

This uses one look ahead for each letter, each of which asserts that the letter is present. The (?i) switch turns on case insensitivity.

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Way too advanced for me even to think of its existence) –  Denis Kulagin Apr 16 at 13:53
    
@Bohemian: does it really work? "abc".matches("(?i)(?=.*a)(?=.*b)(?=.*c)") is resulting in false... –  bobbel Apr 16 at 15:20
    
@bobbel whoops! forgot the .* at the end. see latest edit. –  Bohemian Apr 16 at 16:04

There is no way to solve it using regular expressions. Instead use boolean array to store if each of 26 symbols has occured in your string. Then iterate over string, character by character. In the end check, if each element of your boolean array equals to TRUE (FALSE).

Profit!

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1  
Or just loop through all characters in a method and step out by returning false if one character could not be found! –  bobbel Apr 16 at 13:18
    
@bobbel No way! It would be inefficient and writing inefficient programs is not a good way to brush up programming skills. –  Denis Kulagin Apr 16 at 13:20
1  
+1 I would probably have done it like this. Additional hint : you can fast find the proper index in the array by doing a small subtraction on the int value of the char. –  dystroy Apr 16 at 13:26
    
@DenisKulagin: see my answer. I'm not sure, if this is what you expected that I wanted to explain. Is this inefficient? –  bobbel Apr 16 at 13:30
    
-1 you are incorrect about it being unsolvable using regex: It can be done like this –  Bohemian Apr 16 at 13:36

Here is a non regex based solution, in case you are interested in it:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    Set<Character> letters = new HashSet<>();
    Scanner in = new Scanner(new FileReader("input.txt"));
    try {
        while (in.hasNextLine()) {
            letters.clear();
            for (char c : in.nextLine().toCharArray()) {
                if (Character.isLetter(c)) letters.add(toLowerCase(c));
            }
            System.out.println(letters.size() == 26);
        }
    } finally { in.close(); }
}
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Extract this in a new method and loop over all characters:

static boolean containsAllCharacters(String line) {
    if (line.length() < 26) {
        // if string is less than 26 characters long,
        // it won't hold all characters in it
        return false;
    }

    for (char c = 'a'; c <= 'z'; c++) {
        if (line.indexOf(c) == -1) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

Then you can call it like:

String line = in.nextLine();
System.out.println(line);
System.out.println(containsAllCharacters(line) ? "TRUE" : "FALSE");
share|improve this answer
    
It is O(n * m) by time, where n is length of string and m is size of alphabet. My solution is just O(n) but requires O(m) additional memory, while your solution requires O(1) additional memory. That is why I called it inefficient, but it's surely could be debated. –  Denis Kulagin Apr 16 at 13:52
    
Okay, I see... Thanks for the explanation! –  bobbel Apr 16 at 13:55
    
This is pretty cool. So I see that the for loop iterates through each letter one by one from a to z, but is this something built in to Java? How exactly does it know the order of the alphabet automatically? –  Fluke Apr 16 at 14:11
    
'a' is just a character presentation of the ASCII value 97. 'z' is the value 122. With that you can add and substract your characters as you want. It would be the same looping from 97 till 122 and converting this number to a character to fit into the indexOf method. –  bobbel Apr 16 at 14:18

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