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I have 1 base class and a couple of derrived classes that are pretty identic to the base. They look kind of like that:

class Base
{
protected:
    data stuff;
    size_t length;
public:
    Base();
    ~Base();
    virtual void print() 
    {
       std::cout << "Base" << std::endl;
    }
    // Some more virtual functions
};

class Der1: public Base
{
public:
    void print()
    {
       std::cout << "Der1" << std::endl;
       Base::print();
    }
};

class Der2: public Base
{
public:
    void print()
    {
       std::cout << "Der2" << std::endl;
       Base::print();
    }
};

This example is kind of stupid, but what I want to say is that derived classes don't really affect the data itself - only 1 method that does something before actually printing data.

The problem I have is that I have some functions that get Base class as a parameter and does something with the data. The problem is - I can pass derived classes to those functions, but they are passes as Base class - so they lose their overloaded print, and if printed from inside of such function - it won't print any "Der1" or "Der2" strings to stdout.

Edit: They are passed as (const Base &source)

So my question is - what is a way to properly pass derived classes to such functions?

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You can pass & or pointer, so your classes will keep their dynamic class. If you pass them by value, a new object will constructed (with less functionality), that's called slicing. –  Melkon Apr 16 at 14:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like your functions get Base class as the parameter by value. If you use passing by reference instead - so function(Base& object) instead of function(Base object) - nothing will be lost.

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I am passing them as (const Base &source), can that be a problem? –  Testie Apr 16 at 15:00
    
No it only changes whether your functions may modify the parameter, but still nothing will be lost. –  Wojtek Surowka Apr 16 at 15:19
    
Oh, okay, got it to work. Thanks for help! –  Testie Apr 16 at 15:28

In addition to previous answer, please see below your example:

#include <iostream>

class Base
{protected:
int stuff;
size_t length;
public:
Base(){};
~Base(){};
virtual void print()
{std::cout << "Base" << std::endl;}
// Some more virtual functions
};

class Der1: public Base
{public:
Der1(){};
~Der1(){};
void print()
{
   std::cout << "Der1" << std::endl;
   Base::print();
};
};
class Der2: public Base
{public:
void print()
{
   std::cout << "Der2" << std::endl;
   Base::print();
};
};

void function(Base& base)
{
  base.print();
}

int main(void)
{
 Der1 derived;
 function(derived);
 return 0;
}

Execution: Der1 Base

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