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I’m trying to create a list of objects, each object has a Name member that may be changed by the program or the user, and I want to prevent the object’s Name to change to a name that already exists in the list.

Example:

Class Recipe {
  Public String Name {get; set;}
  Public int difficulty_level {get; set;}
  Public List<string> Ingredients = new List<string>();
  Public Recipe (string name) {Name = name;}
}

Class RecipeBook {
  Public List<Recipe> RecipeList = new List<Recipe>();
  Public AddRecipe {RecipeList.Add (AssignUniqueName());}
  Public RecipeBook() { }
}

When a recipe is added it is done at the List level so it’s easy to assign it a unique name. Recipe objects can be edited by the user using a PropertyGrid control in the UI. If a user is trying to change the Name property to a name of another recipe, I would like the PropertyGrid to prevent that (as if we typed text in a numeric field). Ideally, the Name property wouldn’t change. If that’s not possible then it will change, validation will fail and the change will be reverted.

Since each Recipe object is only aware of itself and not aware of the other recipes, how can I how can I prevent the user from changing the name of the Recipe object to a name that exists?

Here are the approaches I considered:

  1. Validation with TypeConverter. Seems like TypeConverter is the right tool for validations so that would be the preferred approach. Problem: I need a list of existing names for the validation, and I can’t pass any arguments to TypeConverter.
  2. Implementing INotifyChangedProperty. The Recipe object will notify the change using an event, send the old and the new values, and the list will listen to the event, validate and will revert the change if needed. It will probably work, but I'm hoping there's a more elegant solution. I also don't know how to reflect that in the PropertyGrid as an error message.
  3. ObservableCollection. It only observes adding/removing items. Not changes to these items.
  4. Include a reference in Recipe to the RecipeList and use the setter to validate changes and throw an exception if validation fails. Will probably work, I just don't feel it's a good design.

Bonus question: is there a way to ensure that a Recipe will only be added to one RecipeBook? Meaning, no more than one List will point/reference any Recipe object?

Thank you very much in advance!

share|improve this question
    
ok, it looks like before you even start you are going to need a list of every recipe to compare the new one to. Where are these stored? I'm guessing in a db –  Scott Selby Apr 16 '14 at 15:36
    
Sounds like that should be on RecipeBook, not recipe doesn't it. So passing the RecipeBook instance to Recipe's constructor would be a quick way out –  Tony Hopkinson Apr 16 '14 at 15:37
    
you want each recipe object to have a unique name? –  HackerMan Apr 16 '14 at 19:11
    
@HackerMan Yes, that's exactly what I'm after –  Itay Apr 16 '14 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The best option is to prevent users from creating Recipe objects directly, instead forcing them to go through the recipe book in order to create a new recipe. It's also going to be a lot easier to work with if the Recipe object is immutable, rather than immutable. Dealing with having recipes being mutated, and still maintaining this constraint, is going to be a nightmare. This can be done by making Recipe an inner class of RecipeBook, not exposing it publicly, and having an interface that does expose what should be publicly visible.

public interface IRecipe
{
    public string Name { get; }
    public IEnumerable<string> Ingredients { get; }
    public int Difficulty { get; }
}
public class RecipeBook
{
    private List<Recipe> recipes = new List<Recipe>();

    public IRecipe AddRecipe(string name, IEnumerable<string> ingredients,
        int difficulty)
    {
        if (recipes.Any(recipe => recipe.Name == name))
            throw new ArgumentException("Recipe name already exists");
        var result = new Recipe(name, ingredients, difficulty);
        recipes.Add(result);
        return result;
    }

    private class Recipe : IRecipe
    {
        public Recipe(string name, IEnumerable<string> ingredients,
            int difficulty)
        {
            Name = name;
            Ingredients = ingredients.ToList();
            Difficulty = difficulty;
        }

        public string Name { get; private set; }
        public IEnumerable<string> Ingredients { get; private set; }
        public int Difficulty { get; private set; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But the Recipe object must be edited using PropertyGrid... –  Itay Apr 16 '14 at 15:57
    
is it bad idea to use static variables? –  HackerMan Apr 16 '14 at 19:29
    
@HackerMan When the data they are holding is not inherently static, yes. When the data itself is conceptually representing data that is shared throughout the application, then it's appropriate. –  Servy Apr 16 '14 at 19:32

Can't be sure exactly how you are wanting to get the unique name but

Public bool AddRecipe(string TheUsersSpecifiedName)
{
bool noDuplicates = true;
foreach (Recipe r in RecipeList)
{
if (r.Name == TheUserSpecifiedName)
throw new ArgumentException();  //or whatever...
noDuplicates = false;
break;
}
if (noDuplicates)
{
Recipe theRecipe = new Recipe(TheUserSpecifiedName)
RecipeList.Add(theRecipe);
}

return noDuplicates;
}

I know some will disagree with throwing an Argument exception, but you get the idea. Hope this is what you were after.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't prevent a Recipe from being created with its constructor directly, thus avoiding this constraint, or by setting the name after construction to some conflicting name. –  Servy Apr 16 '14 at 15:42

Create a static Name list inside Recipe class

Class Recipe {
  private static List<string> names=new List<string>();
   private string name;
 Public String Name {get{return name;}
 set{
foreach(string nam in names) 
{
if(nam==value)//tell the user to try another name
else{  name=value;names.Add(name);}
}

}
}

  Public int difficulty_level {get; set;}
  Public List<string> Ingredients = new List<string>();
  Public Recipe (string name) {Name = name;}
}

Class RecipeBook {
  Public List<Recipe> RecipeList = new List<Recipe>();
  Public AddRecipe {RecipeList.Add (AssignUniqueName());}
  Public RecipeBook() { }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But names are allowed to be duplicated so long as the recipes are in different books. It is only recipes in the same book that cannot be duplicated. –  Servy Apr 16 '14 at 19:22

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