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Directive in AngularJS: I find out that the elements inside an element with the directive do not inherit its "scope".

For example:

app
.controller('xxx', function($scope) {})
.directive('yyy', function() {
  return {
    scope: {},
    link: function(scope,elem,attrs) {}
  };
});

When we use it in the HTML:

<body ng-controller="xxx">
  <div id='withD' yyy>
    <div id='inside'>Inside the element with a directive</div>
  </div>
</body>

"body" will have a scope whose $id may be 003; then "#withD" will have an isolate scope $id=004; the "#inside" will have the scope $id=003, which means the "#inside" inherits "body"'s scope.

If I use "transinclude" for the directive "yyy"; then "body" scope.$id=003, "#withD" scope.$id=004, "#inside" scope.$id=005; moreover, 003 has two children 004 and 005. However, I wanna make the element with the directive has an isolate scope and its child elements inherit the scope.

I read over "ui.bootstrap.tabs" source code but I do not like the style, for it is strange and also not make the parent element share its scope with child elements'; it looks like this:

app
.directive('xitem', function() {
  scope: {},
  controller: function($scope) {
    $scope.subitem = [];
    return {
      add: function(xsubitem) {$scope.subitem.push(xsubitem);}
    }
  },
  link: function(scope,elem,attrs) {}
})
.directive('xsubitem', function() {
  require: '^xitem',
  link: function(scope,elem,attrs,ctrl) {ctrl.add(elem);}
});

My expectation is that:

<div ng-controller="xxx">
  <div yyy>
    <button ng-click="sayHi()">Hi</button>
  <div>
</div>

when you click the "Hi" button, the alert dialog will pop up with the message "Hello World" not "Error: Scope".

app
.controller('xxx', function($scope) {
  $scope.sayHi = function(){alert('Error: Scope');};
})
.directive('yyy', function() {
  return {
    scope: {},
    link: function(scope,elem,attrs) {
      scope.sayHi = function(){alert('Hello World');};
    }
  };
});

Moreover, I tried this:

app
.controller('xxx', function($scope) {
  $scope.sayHi = function(){alert('Error: Scope');};
})
.directive('yyy', function() {
  return {
    scope: {},
    controller: function($scope, $compile) {$scope._compile = $compile;}
    link: function(scope,elem,attrs) {
      elem.children().forEach(function(one) {
        scope._compile(one)(scope);
      });
      scope.sayHi = function(){alert('Hello World');};
    }
  };
});

Then it will pop up two alert dialogs with the message "Error: Scope" and "Hello World" respectively.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To do what you want, you need to use a template (either as a string or a templateUrl). If angularjs would work how you expect it in this case then a lot of the angular directives wouldn't work right (such as ng-show, ng-click, etc).

So to work how you want it, change your html to this:

<script type="text/ng-template" id="zzz.html">
  <button ng-click="sayHi()">Hi 2</button>
</script>

<div ng-controller="xxx">

  <button ng-click="sayHi()">Hi 1</button>

  <div yyy></div>
</div>

And update your directive definition to use a templateUrl (or you can provide the string as a template property)

app
  .controller('xxx', function($scope) {
    $scope.sayHi = function() {
      console.error('Error: Scope in xxx', new Date());
    };
  })
  .directive('yyy', function() {
    return {
      scope: {},
      templateUrl: 'zzz.html',

      link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {
        scope.sayHi = function() {
          console.log('Hello World in zzz', new Date());
        };
      }
    };
  });

Here's a plunker with this code: http://plnkr.co/edit/nDathkanbULyHHzuI2Rf?p=preview

Update to use multiple templates

Your latest comment was a question about what if you wanted to use different templates on the same page. In that case we can use ng-include.

html:

  <div yyy contents="template1.html"></div>
  <div yyy contents="template2.html"></div>
  <div yyy contents="template3.html"></div>

js:

app
  .controller('xxx', ...)
  .directive('yyy', function() {
    return {
      scope: {
        theTemplateUrl: '@contents'
      },
      template: '<ng-include src="theTemplateUrl"></ng-include>',

      link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {
        scope.sayHi = function() {
          console.log('Hello World in yyy', new Date());
        };
      }
    };
  });

The benefit of using ng-include is that this is already built into angularjs and is well tested. Plus it supports loading template either inline in a script tag or from an actual url or even pre-loaded into the angular module cache.

And again, here is a plunker with a working sample: http://plnkr.co/edit/uaC4Vcs3IgirChSOrfSL?p=preview

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. However, if I wanna use the directive in a generic way, templateUrl is not a good choice. Thus I have to think about how to make the isolate scope inherited. For example, if the directive is a part of a library, "zzz.html" is limited when the directive will be used many times. –  Doz Parp Apr 16 at 19:35
    
In my opinion, if you want to have it be generic, then using a templateUrl IS the way to go. If you use templateUrl then someone else can provide their own template or they can use the one that you provide. Or maybe I'm mistaken, what do you envision when you say that you want it to be "generic"? –  JoseM Apr 16 at 20:52
    
If I use the directive 3 times in one page, how to identify the templates when I have 3 different templates? –  Doz Parp Apr 17 at 0:07
    
@DozParp see my updated answer –  JoseM Apr 17 at 13:17
    
That's cool. However, I would also like to manipulate elements in the template like some special divs and buttons. I am afraid that your method may be not satisfied. –  Doz Parp Apr 17 at 15:32

Now I found the solution - load template dynamically and use $compile to specify scope:

.controller('main', function($scope) {
  $scope.sayHi = function() {alert('scope error');};}
)
.directive('scopeInherit', ['$http', '$compile', function($http, $compile) {
  return {
    scope: {},
    link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {
      scope.sayHi = function() {alert('hello world');};
      scope.contents = angular.element('<div>');
      $http.get(elem.attr('contentsURL'))
           .success(function (contents) {
             scope.contents.html(contents);
             $compile(scope.contents)(scope);
           });
    },
  };
}]);

Then we write HTML:

<div ng-controller="main">
  <div scope-inherit contents="test.html"></div>
</div>

where there is a test.html:

<button ng-click="sayHi()">speak</button>

Then click on the "speak" button, it will pop up the alert dialog with "hello world"

share|improve this answer
    
See my updated answer to use ng-include, it's much simpler than manually doing a $http.get –  JoseM Apr 17 at 13:30

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