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Ok people at this link for pysec as the technical solution is explained we have some code that you must type to the command prompt (i think because it has a dollar sign in front):

$ cd ~/path/to/pysec && python -c "import sqlite3; sqlite3.connect('edgar.db')"
$ mv ./local-settings-example.py ./local-settings.py
$ mkdir ./pysec/data

However whenever i go to C:\Python27\pysec-master which is the location where the pysec file is stored (according to instructions) and type these commands exactly as i see them i get that the system cannot find the path specified.

Like this

C:\Python27\pysec-master>cd ~/path/to/pysec && python -c
cmd response --> The system cannot find the path specified.

C:\Python27\pysec-master>cd ~/path/to/pysec && python -c "import sqlite3; sqlite3.connect('edgar.db')"
cmd response --> The system cannot find the path specified.

C:\Python27\pysec-master>mv ./local-settings-example.py ./local-settings.py
cmd response --> 'mv' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file.

C:\Python27\pysec-master>mkdir ./pysec/data
cmd response --> The syntax of the command is incorrect.

What seems to be the problem? Don't you have to type these commands in the cmd since they have a dollar sign?

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1  
cd ~..., mv .` and mkdir .\ looks more like unix syntax than windows-cmd. cd and mkdir work on both platforms, but with different syntax. The cmd-version of mv is move. –  Stephan Apr 16 '14 at 19:30
2  
also /path/to/pysec tells you, that you should put in the path to pysec, not the string "\path\to\pysec" –  Stephan Apr 16 '14 at 19:32
    
Can we transform these commands to Windows syntax? –  ExoticBirdsMerchant Apr 16 '14 at 19:32
1  
the tilde (~) has a special meaning in unix. I don't speak unix, but I think it means "Systemdrive". The CMD command would be: cd /d "c:\Python27\pysec-master" (in CMD use \, in unix it's /). Instead of mv use move –  Stephan Apr 16 '14 at 19:41
1  
mkdir .\pysec\data ... You remember? "in CMD use \, in unix it's /". –  Stephan Apr 16 '14 at 19:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

ANSWER FOR THIS QUESTION IS PROVIDED FROM THE COMMENTS UNDER THE QUESTION BY USER Stephan

I decided to put the all together in on place>

  1. cd ~..., mv .` and mkdir .\ looks more like unix syntax than windows-cmd. cd and mkdir work on both platforms, but with different syntax. The cmd-version of mv is move.(ANSWER)

  2. also /path/to/pysec tells you, that you should put in the path to pysec, not the string "\path\to\pysec"(ANSWER)

  3. Can we transform these commands to Windows syntax?(QUESTION)

  4. Should we put the path to pysec like this: C:\Python27\pysec-master i mean the full or absolute as it is called path? Because it that tutorial I can see that the example is trimmed as cd ~/path/to/pysec`(QUESTION)

  5. the tilde (~) has a special meaning in unix. I don't speak unix, but I think it means "Systemdrive". The CMD command would be: cd /d "c:\Python27\pysec-master" (in CMD use \, in unix it's /). Instead of mv use move (ANSWER)

  6. Only the third command does not seem to work mkdir ./pysec/data well I think there muse be something different for windows (QUESTION)

  7. mkdir .\pysec\data ... You remember? "in CMD use \, in unix it's /"(ANSWER)

THANK YOU FOR THE SUPPORT

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1  
You're welcome. Please accept your answer, so that everyone can see, that this question has been answered. –  Stephan Apr 18 '14 at 14:29
    
Thank you Stephan. I can accept it according to time in 4 hours. I will do so when the timer allows me. –  ExoticBirdsMerchant Apr 18 '14 at 14:49

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