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I have this method in a NSObject subclass:

- (CFStringRef)UTITypeForPath:(NSString *)path {
    NSString *extension = [path pathExtension];
    CFStringRef result = UTTypeCreatePreferredIdentifierForTag(kUTTagClassFilenameExtension, (__bridge CFStringRef)extension, NULL);
    return result;
  }

That generates this logic Analyzer warning:

Potential leak of an object stored into 'result'

The question is how to deal with it in a clean way:

  • I can't use CFAutorelease because it's iOS 7+ only.
  • Can't use Apple Core Foundation naming conventions (Create/Get rules) because it is an Objective-C method and not a C function (in contrast with this related question).

Also I wonder if this method should return a retained object in the first place.

share|improve this question
    
This is precisely what CFBridgingRelease() was built for. Beyond that you could just bridge the thing and send it an -autorelease . –  CodaFi Apr 17 '14 at 2:02
    
Not when using ARC. –  Rivera Apr 17 '14 at 2:15
    
What does that matter? Look at the definition of CFBridgingRelease(). ARC or not, the function is available and does precisely what the second half of my comment suggests. –  CodaFi Apr 17 '14 at 2:16
    
I was talking about your second option: use autorelease. As for the using CFBridgingRelease, you mean I should create a "mock" NSString reference with it and return the CFStringRef? I guess the variable will be autoreleased but there would be a warming about the unused mock variable. –  Rivera Apr 17 '14 at 5:04
    
Why not make it a C function? It is a self-contained set of steps that don’t require access to self or other things that can be tricky with C functions, so make it a function and use the CF naming conventions. –  Zev Eisenberg Apr 17 '14 at 14:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Possible solutions:

Rename your method according to the naming conventions of the Objective-C Basic Memory Management Rules, e.g. start the method name with "copy":

- (CFStringRef)copyUTITypeForPath:(NSString *)path {
    NSString *extension = [path pathExtension];
    CFStringRef result = UTTypeCreatePreferredIdentifierForTag(kUTTagClassFilenameExtension, (__bridge CFStringRef)extension, NULL);
    return result;
}

Then the caller of the method is responsible for releasing the CFStringRef eventually.

Or change your method to return NSString * instead of CFStringRef:

- (NSString *)UTITypeForPath:(NSString *)path {
    NSString *extension = [path pathExtension];
    CFStringRef result = UTTypeCreatePreferredIdentifierForTag(kUTTagClassFilenameExtension, (__bridge CFStringRef)extension, NULL);
    return CFBridgingRelease(result);
}

In this case ARC will take care of releasing the NSString object.

share|improve this answer
    
So in sum there is no clean way to keep it: a) a NS method, b) return a CFStringRef? As a note: I did finish turning it into a function as your first solution suggests. –  Rivera Apr 17 '14 at 5:21
    
@Rivera: The first solution is a NS method returning a CFStringRef (but not autoreleased). - You could autorelease a mock NSString object (as discussed in the comments), but then you have to compile this source file without ARC because the ARC compiler does not allow autorelease calls. –  Martin R Apr 17 '14 at 5:46
    
You're right, my bad. –  Rivera Apr 17 '14 at 6:04

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