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I noticed that whichever user I am logged in with on my linux system they all use the same DB wen they use the mongo command, and thus the same data. Is there some Mongo setting to make it use a different DB per user?

Basically, I'd like user1 to log into linux, start mongo and do db.foobars.insert(...). When user2 logs in to the linux machine he can do db.foobars.find(...) but should not see any of user1's data. Each collection that a user makes should be specific to that user only.

I'm on Arch Linux, and I start mongodb as a system service with systemd by doing

systemctl start mongodb

which runs an instance of mongod. I was hoping that was all I needed. Would I need to run a new instance of mongod for each user?

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Not really how MongoDB works or databases in general for that matter. And since this does not seem to have anything to do with programming at all it really doesn't belong here. Try (dba.stackexchange.com)[dba.stackexchange.com/] or possibly one of the other linux related sites. stackexchange.com –  Neil Lunn Apr 17 at 4:05

1 Answer 1

The mongo command connects to the default database called "test" if no parameter is passed. You can specify a database by running mongo mydatabase.

I would recommend creating an alias for every user to connect to a different database. For instance, in your ~/.bashrc file, you could add a line like so:

alias mongo=mongo trusktr

If you want to create an alias for all users, in /etc/profile file, you can add:

alias mongo=mongo $(whoami)
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Thanks for the edit Christian P! Good idea. –  Nicholas Rempel Apr 17 at 17:56
    
Oh ok. But then userB would be able to do use userA to access and modify userA's db, right? In postgre each db created by a user is restricted so that only the user who created it can access it (unless he grants more permissions). I was hoping I could have it like that with MongoDB. –  trusktr Apr 22 at 8:19
    
The mongo docs are pretty good. I would start here: docs.mongodb.org/manual/administration/… –  Nicholas Rempel Apr 23 at 1:10

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