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I am writing an app where I want to edit collection inside of another collection. Because of this, I have a repeating form for each element of the collection.

Full example is http://plnkr.co/edit/SP5IRaZZJfTaE9DISrXs?p=preview below is the key part:

<div ng-repeat="u in users" class="user">
  <div>{{u.name}} <button ng-click="delete(users, $index)">X</button></div>

  <div class="contacts">Contacts:
    <ul><li ng-repeat="c in u.contacts">{{c.name}}
          <button ng-click="delete(u.pseudos, $index)">X</button></li>

        <!-- This will be users[index].newContactName - ugly... -->
        <li><input type="text" ng-model="u.newContactName" />
          <button ng-click="addContact($index)">add contact</button></li></ul>
  </div>
</div>
<!-- This will be $scope.newUser - no problem -->
<input type="text" ng-model="newUser" /><button ng-click="addUser()">add user</button>

This kind of worked, until I needed to watch the collection - now editing newContactName triggers my "deep" watch:

$scope.$watch('users', function(newUsers, oldUsers) {
  // $scope.log = $scope.log + "users updated\n";
}, true);

What is the "canonical" way of doing such things in Angular? Should I have a parallel collection of "new contacts" per each user, so watching users will be unaffected? (keeping it in sync will be weird)

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2  
What are you trying to do? Why is there a problem if the watch is triggered? –  Catalin Munteanu Apr 17 '14 at 6:51
    
You want to detect changes on the users ? –  Konstantin Krass Apr 17 '14 at 7:13
    
Yes, I want to watch changes on the users and contacts, to re-compute some network properties of their contact list (e.g. display all 2nd level contacts, 3rd level etc). It's a prototype for testing various algorithms for those computations. –  alexandroid Apr 17 '14 at 8:05

2 Answers 2

I would watch it this way:

  $scope.$watch('users', function(newUsers, oldUsers) {
    //detect changes in user list
    if (newUsers.length > oldUsers.length) {
      alert("user added\n")
      //do something 
      return;
    }
    if (newUsers.length < oldUsers.length) {
      alert("user deleted\n")
      //do something 
      return;
    }
    //nothing has changed in users. Examine contacts (This is the part I am not proud of, since it may take bloody ages with thousands of users and contacts)
    angular.forEach(newUsers, function(user, index) {
      if (user.contacts.length > oldUsers[index].contacts.length) {
        alert('Contact added to: ' + user.name);
        //do something 
        return;
      }
      if (user.contacts.length < oldUsers[index].contacts.length) {
        alert('Contact deleted from: ' + user.name);
        //do something 
        return;
      }
    })
    //nothing has changed in contacts too? Must be some lousy edit!
  }, true);

Not sure if this is canonical angular zen or if the new watchCollection is better suited. But, hey, it works: Forked Plunker with lots of Alerts

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this works but I am not sure I like that it will be called each time a field is being edited... –  alexandroid Apr 20 '14 at 6:41
    
Yes, of course it is somehow pointless to watch an array when you have routines that add something to the array. But that's what you asked for:-) –  mainguy Apr 20 '14 at 8:00

For now I ended up going with having a parallel array of forms, and updating it in parallel, I am having other collections under each user and this "new forms" collection can hold fields for all of them: http://plnkr.co/edit/nyrI1zXTP3JyZlqs1fWJ?p=preview (added logging of watch-updates too)

Key parts:

<div ng-repeat="u in users" class="user">
  <div>{{u.name}} <button ng-click="delete($index, [users, userNewForms])">X</button></div>
  <div class="contacts">Contacts:
    <ul><li ng-repeat="c in u.contacts">{{c.name}}
          <button ng-click="delete($index, u.contacts)">X</button></li>

        <li><input type="text" ng-model="userNewForms[$index].newContactName" />
          <button ng-click="addContact($index)">add contact</button></li></ul>
  </div>
</div>
<input type="text" ng-model="newUser" /><button ng-click="addUser()">add user</button>

Javascript:

  $scope.addContact = function(userIndex) {
    var user = $scope.userNewForms[ userIndex ];
    $scope.users[ userIndex ].contacts.push( {'name': user.newContactName } );
  }

  $scope.delete = function(index, arraysOrArray) {
    if(arraysOrArray[0] instanceof Array) {
       for( var i = 0; i < arraysOrArray.length; ++i ) {
          arraysOrArray[i].splice( index, 1 );
       }
    }
    else {
      arraysOrArray.splice( index, 1 );
    }
  }
...    
function computeNewContactForms(users) {
   var result = [];
   for( var u in users ) {
      result.push( makeNewContactForm() );
   }
   return result;
}

function makeNewContactForm() { return { 'newContactName': '' }; }

Most interesting thing was a discovery that if I use for(a in arrayOrArrays) instead of an index-based iteration, then I get an exception. It looks like "in" form triggers immediate update of bindings or something.

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