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Im using the following method to generate pass phrases for aes encryption.

MY aes needs 16 bytes for a key.

Here is how I am getting my key

    public  byte[] sha256digest16(String[] list) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, UnsupportedEncodingException {
        MessageDigest digest = MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-256");
        digest.reset();
        for(String s: list){
            digest.update(s.getBytes("UTF-8"));
        }
        byte[]  b = digest.digest();

        return String.format("%0" + (b.length) + 'x', new BigInteger(1, b)).getBytes("UTF-8");

    }

However, it is 64 bytes. How I can I get this method to return a 16 byte string

EDIT The main reason Im doing this is because my python code is

from Crypto.Hash import SHA256


myHash = SHA256.new()
myHash.update("265jMeges")
print myHash.hexdigest()

which outputs

917ef7e7be4a84e279b74a257953307f1cff4a2e3d221e363ead528c6b556edb

where is the java output of is

efbfbd7eefbfbdefbfbd4aefbfbdefbfbd79efbfbd4a257953307f1cefbfbd4a2e3d221e363eefbfbd52efbfbd6b556eefbfbd

for the same string. Why are they different?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure you're not using SHA512 if you're getting 64 bytes? Either way, no current hash gives a result as short as 128 bits, so you'll just have to truncate the output. –  Joachim Isaksson Apr 17 '14 at 10:11
    
Can you please tell me how I can truncate that output? –  Cripto Apr 17 '14 at 10:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

SHA-256 returns 32 bytes by default (256 / 8 = 32), not 16. The normal way to use a part of a hash is to use the first (leftmost) 16 bytes of the resulting hash. You can do this by applying the Java copyOf method on the result of SHA-256.

Please use a real hexadecimal encoder to display the result (not to return a value, you don't need any String instances at all). Using BigInteger is error prone and may add or remove bytes.

Try for instance:

public static byte[] sha256digest16(String[] list) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, UnsupportedEncodingException {
    MessageDigest digest = MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-256");
    digest.reset();
    for(String s: list){
        digest.update(s.getBytes("UTF-8"));
    }

    // so you have 32 bytes here
    byte[]  b = digest.digest();

    // you can return it directly or you can cut it to 16 bytes
    return Arrays.copyOf(b, 16);
}

For display as hexadecimals use:

public static String tohex(byte[] data) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(data.length * 2);
    for (int i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
        sb.append(String.format("%02X", data[i] & 0xFF));
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

Or use one of the hex encoders of the Apache commons codec, Bouncy Castle or Guava.

share|improve this answer
    
please take a look at my update! –  Cripto Apr 17 '14 at 18:49
1  
So you are displaying 64 hex characters, as there are 2 characters per byte, you simply display 32 bytes, i.e. the full output of the hash. What's there to see? Changed your code in my answer, see if this fits you. –  Maarten Bodewes Apr 17 '14 at 19:01
    
I wish I could give you more up votes. Thank you –  Cripto Apr 17 '14 at 19:21
    
example on common codec would be nice :) –  Titi Wangsa bin Damhore Oct 9 '14 at 4:22

You're formatting the result bytes as hex, which multiplies the bit occupancy by a factor of 2. You'll never get 16 bytes that way. Get rid of the String.format() line and just return the result of the digest() method. I expect you're repeating the process elsewhere which is doubling it again,

share|improve this answer
    
please take a look at my new edit –  Cripto Apr 17 '14 at 18:50
    
-1 as SHA 256 won't return 16 bytes anyway. –  Maarten Bodewes Apr 17 '14 at 19:05

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