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As we all know that an interface can inherit another interface, and interface can only contain method signature.

interface A
{
    void DoWorkA()
    { }
}

interface B : A
{
    void DoWorkB()
    { }
}

Now the class which implement interface B need to provide body of two functions.

public class ABC : B
{
    public void DoWorkB()
    {
        //do some work
    }

    public void DoWorkA()
    {
        //do some work
    }
 }

So why can't be a interface can inherit a abstract class or a normal class.

So if interface inherited abstract class then class which implement this interface need to provide implementation of all interface and abstract methods of abstract class.

Why this is not possible.

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2  
Does the question aim more at a clarification of C# syntax or more for a design rationale? –  Codor Apr 17 '14 at 11:33
1  
Why should it be possible? It doesn't make any sense to be honest. –  walther Apr 17 '14 at 11:34
    
Are you looking for a way to say "I want interface X to have all public members of class ABC."? That might be a useful feature, but on the other hand, it may also not be frequently used, and also, some more thinking would be required as class members can have different access modifiers. –  O. R. Mapper Apr 17 '14 at 11:37
1  
@O.R.Mapper That how I interpreted the question, "Why can't a class ABC imply interface IABC?" And I think it could, but there is no language construct to support it. –  Karl Kieninger Apr 17 '14 at 12:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The major difference between interfaces and classes is that interfaces only provide signatures and not implementations. If the interface inheriting a class inherited its implementation, it would provide implementation and no longer be an interface.

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Because interface is a contract by language definition. It's a language specific type for describing a contract: so you can aggregate different contracts (inherit one interface from another), but contract by itself can not extend something.

Abstract class, can contain implementation:

//PERFECTLY VALID ABSTRACT CLASS DEFINITION
public abstract class A {

    public abstract void Overridable(); //ABSRTACT

    public void DoSomething() {
       //METHOD BODY
    }
}

So inherit interface from something that may, and often, has implementation, does not make sense from language design and OPP point of view.

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Because an interface is not allowed to have any methods or constructors defined in it by definition.

Inheriting an interface from a class would mean that it has some methods and at least a constructor. Even if you do not define a constructor in the base class the compiler would still generate one. The interface would also need a constructor to call the base constructor so you would be violating the afore mentioned rule.

Depending on the case you can be violating much more rules. If the base class has some methods or field the interface would inherit it too.

What happens next if you inherit a class from an interface which inherits another class? You can have multiple inheritance if you inherit multiple interfaces in a class which is prohibited in all .net languages.

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Theoretically you could design a language in which this was possible. The designer of C# choose instead to follow the common convention of OOP in which class do not imply interfaces and therefore cannot be inherited as such.

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1  
This doesn't make sense. An interface does not have any implementation. By that definition, you cannot inherit an implementation.. because it then ceases to be "implementationless". –  Simon Whitehead Apr 17 '14 at 11:37
    
@SimonWhitehead: You could still inherit the interface (i.e. the declarations of public members). So to speak, inherit everything and make everything abstract. However, the fact that some members are not virtual is just one of the obstacles that would have to be considered for such a feature. –  O. R. Mapper Apr 17 '14 at 11:39
1  
@O.R.Mapper ..that sounds completely pointless, given that you can inherit from other interfaces. Extract an actual interface from your implementation and throw that in the inheritance chain. Anyway.. I realise now that Karl is referring to duck typing.. I just didn't read it that way originally. –  Simon Whitehead Apr 17 '14 at 11:42
    
@SimonWhitehead: You cannot inherit from other interfaces if you do not have control about the class ABC. As such, I can see how the desire to "extract" an interface does make sense, despite the outlined difficulties. Try to think outside of the constraints of a single language :-) –  O. R. Mapper Apr 17 '14 at 11:45
    
@O.R.Mapper Good point.. however I was thinking within the constraints of the language tagged in the question :P –  Simon Whitehead Apr 17 '14 at 11:46

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