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I like to get the size of a string in kilobytes. My attempt was this:

  Sub Main()
    Dim Test As String = System.IO.File.ReadAllText("C:\Users\Blubb\Documents\TOS.txt")
    MsgBox("The String 'Test' has a size of " & System.Text.ASCIIEncoding.Unicode.GetByteCount(Test) / 1024 & " kilobytes.")
End Sub

enter image description here

But for a stringe reason the textfile itself is 12kb.

enter image description here

And my code from above returns a bigger size:

enter image description here

What I am doing wrong here?

---------------- SOLVED, Thanks to Steven Doggart --------------

Private Function GetStringSizeInKiloBytes(ByVal Text As String) As Double
    Return Encoding.ASCII.GetByteCount(KeyLog) / 1024
End Function
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2  
Show your code as a text, not as an image. –  Soner Gönül Apr 17 '14 at 11:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Once you load the file into a string, it is immediately encoded as Unicode, regardless of the format of the original file. So what you are seeing is not the size of the file, but rather the size of the Unicode string representation of that file's contents. Based on your results, it looks like the file that you are loading is an ASCII file (one byte per character), but when you get the byte count in unicode (typically 2 bytes per character), it's doubling the size.

As others have said, if all you want is the file length, you can get it via the FileInfo.Length property, which is far more efficient. For instance:

Dim Test As New FileInfo("C:\Users\Blubb\Documents\TOS.txt")
MessageBox.Show("The file has a size of " & Test.Length / 1024 & " kilobytes.")

If however, you really need to load the file first, the best approach is to read the bytes directly rather than loading it into a Unicode encoded string:

Dim Test() As Byte = System.IO.File.ReadAllBytes("C:\Users\Blubb\Documents\TOS.txt")
MessageBox.Show("The byte array 'Test' has a size of " & Test.Length / 1024 & " kilobytes.")

Notice that I used MessageBox.Show which is preferable to the old VB6-style MsgBox function. Or, if you really need to load it as a string, for some reason, you just have to make sure that you use the same encoding to count the bytes as the actual encoding of the original file:

Dim Test As String = System.IO.File.ReadAllText("C:\Users\Blubb\Documents\TOS.txt")
MessageBox.Show("The file loaded into the string 'Test' has a size of " & Encoding.ASCII.GetByteCount(Test) / 1024 & " kilobytes.")

Edit

As another example, using the string that you gave as an example in another comment:

Dim Test As String = "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum."

'Displays 0,436... kilobytes
MessageBox.Show("ASCII size of 'Test': " & Encoding.ASCII.GetByteCount(Test) / 1024 & " kilobytes.")

'Displays 0,871... kilobytes
MessageBox.Show("Unicode size of 'Test': " & Encoding.Unicode.GetByteCount(Test) / 1024 & " kilobytes.")

As you can see, Unicode encoding is double the size in bytes. But both are representations of the same text, just using different byte-formats.

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1  
Maaan, thats what I call a great, detailed answer. That solved my problem more than enough! Thank you very much for taking your time to explain it so understandable. Great user :) –  nexno Apr 17 '14 at 12:58

You don't need to read the file just to get the size. Try this

var length = new FileInfo("yourfilename").Length

and of course you can divide it by 1024 to get the size in KB.

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But even if I copy the text inside the file directly in the variable Dim Test as String = "Filecontenttext that should be 12kb" it still returns me ~23kb –  nexno Apr 17 '14 at 11:50
2  
No, It won't be. File's text representation may be different due to unicode characters, bytes will not be equal to characters count. –  Sriram Sakthivel Apr 17 '14 at 11:52
    
Try it with this text: –  nexno Apr 17 '14 at 12:24
    
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. –  nexno Apr 17 '14 at 12:24
1  
@nexno Again, Don't expect characters count to be equal to bytes. but you can expect it with ASCII not with Unicode. For instance this will behave as you expected. var count = Encoding.ASCII.GetByteCount(text); –  Sriram Sakthivel Apr 17 '14 at 12:38

You could try to get file size using

int fileSize = new FileInfo("path_to_file").Length;
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