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I'm using the next algorithm to calculate the histogram from a YUV420sp image. Seems to work but the result is not 100% accurate for a fully dark image. When the image is dark I would expect to have on the left side of the histogram a high pick showing that the image is too dark, but the algorithm in such scenario shows instead a flat line, no pick. On the other light scenarios the histogram seems to be accurate.

void calculateHistogram(const unsigned char* yuv420sp, const int yuvWidth, const int yuvHeight, const int histogramControlHeight, int* outHistogramData)
{
    const int BINS = 256;

    // Clear the output

    memset(outHistogramData, 0, BINS * sizeof(int));

    // Get YUV brightness values

    const int totalPixels = yuvWidth * yuvHeight;

    for (int index = 0; index < totalPixels; index++)
    {
        char brightness = yuv420sp[index];
        outHistogramData[brightness]++;
    }

    // Get the maximum brightness

    int maxBrightness = 0;

    for (int index = 0; index < BINS; index++)
    {
        if (outHistogramData[index] > maxBrightness)
        {
            maxBrightness = outHistogramData[index];
        }
    }

    // Normalize to fit the UI control height

    const int maxNormalized = BINS * histogramControlHeight / maxBrightness;

    for(int index = 0; index < BINS; index++)
    {
        outHistogramData[index] = (outHistogramData[index] * maxNormalized) >> 8;
    }
}

[SOLVED by galop1n] Though Galop1n implementation is much nicer I'm updating this one with the corrections in case is of use to anyone.

Changes:

1) Reading brightness values into an unsigned char instead of a char.

2) Placed UI normalization division into the normalization loop.

void calculateHistogram(const unsigned char* yuv420sp, const int yuvWidth, const int yuvHeight, const int histogramCanvasHeight, int* outHistogramData)
{
    const int BINS = 256;

    // Clear the output

    memset(outHistogramData, 0, BINS * sizeof(int));

    // Get YUV brightness values

    const int totalPixels = yuvWidth * yuvHeight;

    for (int index = 0; index < totalPixels; index++)
    {
        unsigned char brightness = yuv420sp[index];
        outHistogramData[brightness]++;
    }

    // Get the maximum brightness

    int maxBrightness = 0;

    for (int index = 0; index < BINS; index++)
    {
        if (outHistogramData[index] > maxBrightness)
        {
            maxBrightness = outHistogramData[index];
        }
    }

    // Normalize to fit the UI control height

    for(int index = 0; index < BINS; index++)
    {
        outHistogramData[index] = outHistogramData[index] * histogramCanvasHeight / maxBrightness;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
try int brightness = yuv420sp[index]; instead of char brightness = yuv420sp[index]; or you may index outHistogramData at a negative index. –  galop1n Apr 17 '14 at 12:12
1  
@galop1n - perhaps unsigned char is the best choice given the range of yuv420sp. –  Glenn Apr 17 '14 at 12:15
    
Try debugging. Local variables are of considerable interest. Pay special attention to maxNormalized. What do you expect it to be? –  n.m. Apr 17 '14 at 12:15
    
@yuv420sp Best performance are achieved with variables that are compatible with the native size of a register or the assembly may suffers from bloat code to enforce the smaller size behavior. always try to work with int and go below only when storage is needed. –  galop1n Apr 17 '14 at 12:18
2  
Is it C or C++? You can't code in two languages at once. –  Bartek Banachewicz Apr 17 '14 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is at least two bugs in your implementation.

  1. The indexing by the brightness because of using a temporary of type signed char.
  2. The final normalization result can be influence by the value of control height and the maximum count of pixel in a bin. The division cannot really be put outside of the loop because of that.

I recommend also to use a std::array ( need c++11 ) to store the result instead of a raw pointer as there is a risk the caller do not allocate enough space for what will use the function.

#include <algorithm>
#include <array>

void calculateHistogram(const unsigned char* yuv420sp, const int yuvWidth, const int yuvHeight, const int histogramControlHeight, std::array<int, 256> &outHistogramData ) {
    outHistogramData.fill(0);
    std::for_each( yuv420sp, yuv420sp + yuvWidth * yuvHeight, [&](int e) {
       outHistogramData[e]++;
    } );
    int maxCountInBins = * std::max_element( begin(outHistogramData), end(outHistogramData) );
    for( int &bin : outHistogramData )
        bin = bin * histogramControlHeight / maxCountInBins;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your implementation works perfectly. The problem got solved by placing the division of the normalization inside the loop. Though your code is actually better I've placed and updated code into the question just in case people don't use c++11 –  Zhenya Apr 17 '14 at 13:02

If the maximum brightness of the image maxBrightness is zero, your calculation of maxNormalized becomes a division by zero. I suspect this is where your problem is.

Without better understanding what normalization conditions you are trying to establish, I am not sure what alternative to suggest to you right now.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated the code with some comments. The normalization is to transform the brightness values to fit the UI control height where the histogram will be plotted. –  Zhenya Apr 17 '14 at 12:11
1  
maxBrightness is badly named, it should be maxPixelCountForABucket and there is no way by looking at the algorithm to have zero as long as there is pixels. –  galop1n Apr 17 '14 at 12:14
    
Okay, yeah. I read through the code quickly, and trusted that variable name too much. –  Glenn Apr 17 '14 at 12:18

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