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First of all, I am not using a GUI. (In case that matters.) I want to send the path of a file to a thread (via char *), have it process the file, then return. Preferably, I would like the thread to stop when it's not being used.

The Qt documentation shows two approaches to creating threads:

  1. Create a QObject and moveToThread.

  2. Create a QThread then start() it when it's needed.

In the two approaches above, what is happening if I don't have a run() function? I don't have one because I don't see a way of passing the char* to run(), so I'm using a signal. Do I have to start() the thread in order for it to work properly? If so, what does this do if there is no run()? Can I just create it, connect the signals/slots, then call it when I need it? Does one of the above approaches offer an advantage in this case?

UPDATE: Thank you for the quick response Johannes Schaub and thuga.

1) If I'm using QObject->moveToThread(), that thread is then running in an event loop? And this event loop sleeps when there is no input? (If so, that's good.) The thread (event loop) is tied to QObject's signals and slots, right? So I need to then have this Object's scope be the calling thread by putting it in the constructor? (And quit() wait() in the destructor) It therefore runs for the entire lifetime of the original thread?

2) I don't think I need to have a slot for the QThread, because I only want to invoke it, not communicate back and forth. (Except the finished signal.) So I would do something like this:

a. Create an instance of the QThread:

WorkerThread *workerThread = new WorkerThread(this);

b. Send it the string. This is the part I'm not sure about. I think you Johannes tried to explain, but I'm still not clear. I can't send the filename via a signal/slot because QThreads shouldn't use slots. (but can in moveToThread case because of queued connections)

c. Start the Thread with .start()

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The default QThread::run implementation calls QThread::exec. If you're going to use signals and slots, go with the first approach. –  thuga Apr 17 at 12:47
    
@thuga : The Documentation says "a developer who wishes to invoke slots in the new thread must use the worker-object approach". So I can have a QThread emit signals (i.e. finished()), but I shouldn't have it receive signals? (Because the slots are in the old thread?) –  MrUser Apr 17 at 13:58
    
QThread is not the thread, it is thread controller. Its slots (normally) do not run in the thread it controls. Signals to the QThread instance do not go through the event loop (if there is one) of the thread it controls. –  hyde Apr 18 at 15:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The default run function then calls exec, which enters an event loop. The loop sleeps if it doesnt have an event to process.

The object that you move to the thread is not the QThread object itself. It is another object. The QThread object itself just has the event loop and is still associated with the main thread (its affinity is the main thread).

If the thread operates in the background, you best use QString as the filename and then call a respective "processFile" function or similar of that object that you pass the file name. The invocation can either be by a signal slot connection or an explicit QMetaObject::invokeMethod, using the connection type QueuedConnection (which passes an event into the event loop of the thread of the object, so your file names are automagically queued by being contained in that internal slot call event).

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Thank you for the response Johannes. You definitely answered the question, but would you mind giving a little more clarity for the update above? Thanks. –  MrUser Apr 17 at 14:40

It sounds like your thread is supposed to process a char* and then wait. If this is the case, there's a third option available to you where you have a single function that runs in a separate thread and then exits, using QtConcurrent::run()

Simple example:

void workerFunction(QString const &data){
    // ...
}

void callingFunction(){

    // ....

    char *data = .....;

    QFuture<void> future = QtConcurrent::run(workerFunction, QString(data)); 

}

EDIT: If you need more features than a single threaded function but not as many as a fully-fledged subclass of QThread, there is also the QRunnable/QThreadPool pair as a convenient intermediate option.

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Great suggestion. I do need to be able to stop/kill it, though. (The thread will play a sound file stored at the path in the char*) –  MrUser Apr 17 at 14:36

If I'm using QObject->moveToThread(), that thread is then running in an event loop?

Those are completely unrelated. A bare QThread is running the event loop as soon as you start() it. For this to happen you don't need to move any objects to it. Of course the event loop is dormant since there are no incoming events for it to process - so the thread, in spite of having been started, doesn't consume any CPU.

The thread (event loop) is tied to QObject's signals and slots, right?

Signals and slots are simply function call sources and sinks that you can link up. They have not much to do with event loops.

When the sender and receiver objects reside in different threads, the delivery of a slot call is implemented by posting a QMetaCallEvent to the object's event queue. That even, like all events, is given to QObject::event(QEvent*) method. That method acts on the QMetaCallEvent and executes the slot call.

So I need to then have this Object's scope be the calling thread by putting it in the constructor? (And quit() wait() in the destructor) It therefore runs for the entire lifetime of the original thread?

The object's lifetime is decoupled from thread's lifetime. An object that is moved to a given thread can only be destructed from that thread. If the thread terminates first, the object becomes threadless (its thread() returns nullptr), and it can be destructed from any thread, or moved to another thread. A threadless object can't receive any events, but of course it can receive direct slot calls. Queued slot calls won't work since those are delivered as events initially, and only internally converted into calls.

I don't think I need to have a slot for the QThread, because I only want to invoke it, not communicate back and forth.

A QThread is a thread controller. There's very little reason to subclass it. In almost all cases you can either use a QObject that has been moved to the thread, or QtConcurrent::run.

So I would do something like this: [...] Create an instance of the QThread: [...] Send it the string.

You want to send the string to an object that lives in the thread, not to the thread itself.

Here's a small example:

// main.cpp
#include <QThread>
#include <QCoreApplication>
#include <QDebug>

class Worker : public QObject {
public:
  Q_SLOT void say(const QString & str) { qDebug() << str; }
};

/// A thread that's safe to destruct at any time.
class Thread : public QThred {
  using QThread::run;
public:
  ~QThread() { quit(); wait(); }
};

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
  QCoreApplication app(argc, argv);
  Worker worker;
  Thread thread;
  thread.start();
  worker.moveToThread(&thread);
  // Equivalent to invoking the say slot from a signal
  QMetaObject::invokeMethod(&worker, "say", Q_ARG(QString, "hello"));
  //
  QMetaObject::invokeMethod(&app, "quit");
  return app.exec();
}

#include "main.moc"
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