Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following mysql table:

CREATE TABLE `my_table` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `date` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  `login` varchar(64) NOT NULL,
  `state` enum("state_1","state_2","state_3") NOT NULL
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `ix_date` (`date`),
  KEY `ix_login_date` (`login`,`date`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8

This query performs extremely slow (more than 10 minutes):

SELECT
  date,
  @prev_login AS p_login,
  (@prev_login := my_table.login) AS login,
  @prev_state AS from_state,
  (@prev_state := my_table.state) AS state
FROM my_table
JOIN (SELECT @prev_login := NULL) pl
JOIN (SELECT @prev_state := NULL) ps
ORDER BY login, date;

But after removing (@prev_login := my_table.login) AS login string the query finishes in less than a second:

SELECT
  date,
  @prev_login AS p_login,
  @prev_state AS from_state,
  (@prev_state := my_table.state) AS state
FROM my_table
JOIN (SELECT @prev_login := NULL) pl
JOIN (SELECT @prev_state := NULL) ps
ORDER BY login, date;

EXPLAIN outputs the same result for both cases. Why this can happen and how to speed up the first query?

UPD. I've found questions (1, 2) where such slowdown is the result of inappropriate variable collation, but I see no ways it can be applied to my case.

share|improve this question
    
What is the goal/reason of having the xmpp in your query? –  the_pete Apr 17 at 13:33
    
@the_pete, it was an error in the question. There should be my_table. Fixed. –  citxx Apr 17 at 14:02
    
Maybe you should consider indexing your 32M records table on the login column. –  StephaneM Apr 17 at 14:19
    
@StephaneM, I see no reasons for the query to use such index. Both queries use only primary key. There is no index for state, but the same computations for that column are fast. The only difference is the type. –  citxx Apr 17 at 14:54
    
The only thing that I'm unclear about is the join in the query... what happens if you removee the join ? Why do you need a "Join" and not "Where"? –  evenro Apr 17 at 15:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've just found the solution. The reason of slow execution is the sorting by login field. Selecting of (@prev_login := my_table.login) AS login field replaces the original login field, so the index can't be used for ordering. The query should be rewritten in this way:

SELECT
  date,
  @prev_login AS p_login,
  (@prev_login := my_table.login) AS tmp_login,
  login,
  @prev_state AS from_state,
  (@prev_state := my_table.state) AS state
FROM my_table
JOIN (SELECT @prev_login := NULL) pl
JOIN (SELECT @prev_state := NULL) ps
ORDER BY login, date;

P.S. I still don't understand why EXPLAIN doesn't show this issue.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.