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I'm building a single page app whose html body starts as a simple container

<body>
<div id="main-container" class="main-container">
    <div id="accordion">
    <!-- Bouts will be inserted here -->
    </div>
    <button id="myButton" type="button">Click Me!</button>
</div>
</body>

I have document ready event hander that fetches a JSON file and iterates the loaded collection which contains a variable number of entries.

$.getJSON("data/event.json", function (data) {
$.each(data, function (key, val) {
      $("#accordion").append(addBout(val, key)).accordion("refresh");
    });
});

The addBout() method builds an div element (which is an accordion section) which contains several span elements which are dynamically named.

Example :

"<span id=\"current_round_" + (key+1) + "\">1</span>"

So the actual id of the span is current_round_1, current_round_2, etc.

Accessing those spans :

alert($("#current_round_1").html());

fails in the document ready event handler.

I also tried to access the element from window.bind()

$(window).bind("load", function() {
   // code here
});

.... which also fails.

However, if I add a button to the page and access the element in the button's click event handler .....

$("#myButton").click(function() {
        alert($("#current_round_1").html());
    });

Can anyone suggest why the dynamically named elements are not available when the DOM is ready or even when it is "loaded" but can later be manually accessed ?

Thanks in advance.

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What happens if you put alert($("#current_round_1").html()); inside the getJSON callback? –  Archer Apr 17 '14 at 13:27

5 Answers 5

It is failing because your dynamically generated elements are not yet available on document ready. The code that generates them runs asynchronously, so if you have something like this:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $.getJSON("data/event.json", function (data) {
        $.each(data, function (key, val) {
            $("#accordion").append(addBout(val, key)).accordion("refresh");
        });
    });
    alert($("#current_round_1").html());
});

The alert(...) will be executed before the $.getJSON(...) executes the callback. The reason it works when you use a button with a click handler is because it's highly unlikely that you'd be able to click that button before the async call returned. If you added some kind of delay to make the call take longer to return, then clicking the button would fail.

One solution would be to add a function that does whatever it is you need to do with the dynamic elements:

var doStuff = function () {
    alert($("#current_round_1").html());
};

And then have your $.getJSON(...) callback execute that method after rendering the spans:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $.getJSON("data/event.json", function (data) {
        $.each(data, function (key, val) {
            $("#accordion").append(addBout(val, key)).accordion("refresh");
        });
        doStuff(); // <-- won't be executed until the elements have been rendered
    });
});
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my guess is that the issue is that the window load event fires before the AJAX call finished and so before any of the divs are inserted into the dom

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You either need to bind after the object is added or use .on() and delegate.

$('#accordion').on('click', 'span', function(){})
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Well, document ready fires when the document is ready - only the HTML document without dependencies. It is the first DOM. You then alter the DOM and document.ready still has the empty one. The button works as the DOM is done by the time you click it.

It feels a bit roundabout to create a lot of elements and write out dynamic IDs to get them later on again with $(). Why don't you store references of the elements when you create them? That way you cache them in an object and you don't need to read from the DOM again, which can be slow.

In essence: the right time to get a reference to the elements is when your loop finished, before that the elements don't exist.

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I would also suggest that you don't append on each iteration, but instead build up a string (with concat or whatever) until the loop is done, then set the html (or append) the entire string. As for your original question, your problem is that DOMContentReady fires before your Ajax call returns and your new content is in the DOM. You need to fire a callback on the Ajax request's success status ( success: function(){} ), and have that function iterate over your data and insert the final string into the DOM.

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I also meant to add that you'd be better off binding to a container element that is in the page before the Ajax call is made - you essentially delegate the handler to the existing, non-Ajax-ed element, and then inspect the event target in the handler bound to the container element. This will work for static elements and any new elements added via Ajax calls. –  Wigley Apr 18 '14 at 8:43
    
Something like: $(body).on('click.accordion', '#accoridon span, function() { var el = this; // el will be the span that was clicked // now do whatever in response to the span click }); // sorry if this isn't formatted well -- typing this on my phone –  Wigley Apr 18 '14 at 8:46
    
Follow up - instead of delegating to body, delegate to #accordion since that el is in the page when the page initially loads -> $('#accordion').on('click', 'span', function() { // do stuff in response to span click here }); –  Wigley Apr 18 '14 at 8:50

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