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Ok here's the reason i ask, I've got a domain mixed with Windows 2003 and 2008 Servers, same subnet, same domain controller, same dns server, etc, etc.

Now i've got a dns entry for a server that i'm trying to use as a network resource which is tied to an IP, for example lets say its.

network.example.site.com and it's pointed to an IP of 10.0.0.10

All servers can ping network.example.site.com and resolve the IP of 10.0.0.10 with no issues at all. Likely, they can all nslookup network.example.site.com and report back the same IP of 10.0.0.10 so it would seem they are all on the same page.

My problem is with network shares, this site has shares that I want to access by using

\network.example.site.com\sharename

On Windows 2008 (and all Windows 7 clients)

\servername\sharename - works fine \IPaddress\sharename - works fine \network.example.site.com\sharename - works fine

On windows 2003, I get strange behaviour and don't understand the problem

\servername\sharename - works fine \IPaddress\sharename - works fine \network.example.site.com\sharename - doesn't work, says can't resolve

As i mentioned above, the same windows 2003 servers that can't resolve the site name in a share context can ping and nslookup the IP of said site name just fine, so what gives?

1) Why is there a difference, what's different between the OS which causes this? 2) Is there anything I can do to resolve this situation in the registry or something?

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1 Answer 1

I had the same problem and never found a solution, once the servers were upgraded to 2008 everything worked fine, 2003 servers just don't seem to be able to do this. I haven't a clue why so I wouldn't count this as an answer, just adding a second to what you probably already have concluded.

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