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Hi guys I wrote this code and i have two errors.

  1. Invalid rank specifier: expected ',' or ']'
  2. Cannot apply indexing with [] to an expression of type 'int'

Can you help please?

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ArrayList numbers = new ArrayList();

        foreach (int number in new int[12] {10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1}) //error No.1
        {
            numbers.Add(number);
        }

        numbers.Insert(numbers.Count - 1, 75);
        numbers.Remove(7);
        numbers.RemoveAt(6);

        for(int i=0; i<numbers.Count; i++)
        {
            int number = (int) number[i]; // error No.2
            Console.WriteLine(number);
        }
    }
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That code is unreadable. Use the markup available for displaying code. –  JesperE Oct 23 '08 at 20:27
    
Indent all your code with four spaces to make it more readable... –  Drew Noakes Oct 23 '08 at 20:30
    
@arin, check and make sure I formatted this right. It looks like Markup won't let you do 4 levels of indent...? –  Bill the Lizard Oct 23 '08 at 20:31
    
I'm gonna vote this down cause I'm positive that the compiler told you what was wrong already. –  Isak Savo Oct 23 '08 at 20:37
    
arin can you accept answer once you have one that satisfy you. I have notice that all your question never have answer selected. You need to go at the left of the vote and press the check and the answer will become greeen. Have a nice day :) –  Patrick Desjardins Oct 23 '08 at 20:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
using System;
using System.Collections;

namespace ConsoleApplication3
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ArrayList numbers = new ArrayList();
            foreach (int number in new int[] { 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 })
            {
                numbers.Add(number);
            }
            numbers.Insert(numbers.Count - 1, 75);
            numbers.Remove(7);
            numbers.RemoveAt(6);
            for (int i = 0; i < numbers.Count; i++)
            {
                int number = (int)numbers[i];
                Console.WriteLine(number);
            }
        }
    }
}
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1 - You don't have to specify the length of the array just say new int[]

2 - number is just an integer, I think you're trying to access numbers[i]

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For 1:

foreach (int number in new int[] {10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1})

For 2:

int number = (int)numbers[i];

You are using number where you should have numbers (plural).

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Great thanx a lot man that solve the problem –  arin Oct 23 '08 at 20:48

Why not the following for #1?

    for (int x = 10; x > 0; --x)
    {
        numbers.Add(number);
    }

Despite declaring this as an int[12] (as the apparent intent?), it seems like we're only using the values from 10 to 1, inclusive. Why use a foreach in this scenario, when a for is much more clear in its intent?

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this might work thank you but GOD i hate the for loop :-) –  arin Oct 23 '08 at 20:51
    
If we're looking for clarity - why not just numbers.AddRange(new int[] { 10, ..., 1 }? Or, for that matter numbers = new ArrayList(new int[] { 10, ..., 1 }). –  Mark Brackett Oct 23 '08 at 21:59
    
Arin, dare I ask why you hate the for loop? In this case, it's not only more clear, but probably more efficient than creating a new array just to only use it for population. Mark, good call. –  John Rudy Oct 24 '08 at 11:00

You should be initializing the array as

new int[] { 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 };

the compiler will set the size for you. But you're doing it the hard way. Try this:

for (int i = 10; i > 0; i-- )
{
    numbers.Add(i);
}

If you are using .Net 3.5, you can also use System.Linq.Enumerable to create a range:

IEnumerable<int> numbers = Enumerable.Range(1, 10).Reverse();

This would take the place of the ArrayList, which is pretty pointless in 3.5. Since you're just starting, the ArrayList will probably be easier to grasp at first, but keep things like Generics and IEnumerables in mind, they are very important.

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