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Hello guys I don't see the logic in this multiplication of [4x4]matrices:

void matrix::multiplicate( GLdouble nm[ 16 ] )
{
    char x, a, b;
    GLdouble tm[ 16 ];

    for( x=0 ; x<16 ; x++ )
    {
        a = x % 4;  
        b = (x / 4) * 4;

        tm[ x ] = nm[ a    ] * mx[ b   ] +
              nm[ a+4  ] * mx[ b+1 ] +              
              nm[ a+8  ] * mx[ b+2 ] +
              nm[ a+12 ] * mx[ b+3 ];
    }

    for( x=0 ; x<16 ; x++ ) 
        mx[ x ] = tm[ x ];
 }

When the for-loop(x = 0) makes his first round a and b are 0. That's logical -> First row * First column

tm[ 0 ] =     nm[ 0  ] * mx[ 0 ] +
              nm[ 4  ] * mx[ 1 ] +              
              nm[ 8  ] * mx[ 2 ] +
              nm[ 12 ] * mx[ 3 ];

But now x = 1: Second row * First column

tm[ 1 ] =     nm[  1 ] * mx[ 1 ] +
              nm[  5 ] * mx[ 2 ] +              
              nm[  9 ] * mx[ 3 ] +
              nm[ 13 ] * mx[ 4 ];

mx[4] is in the Second column .... it has something to do with b but I don't get it.

share|improve this question
    
Best use a debugger and go through the program line by line and watch the values changing, this should give you a conception of what's actually going on. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 17 at 15:34
    
Wouldn't it be cleaner to use a nested loop, recalculating the index each time? –  James Kanze Apr 17 at 16:24
    
x == 1 is cell [0, 1]: first row, second column. –  James Kanze Apr 17 at 16:26
    
And why are you using char for the indices. int would be far more natural. –  James Kanze Apr 17 at 16:27
    
@JamesKanze Or size_t, which would be even more natural IMHO. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 17 at 17:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's because b is an integer, so b/4 is integer division, and when x=1, b/4 is 0, so b=0

So (x/4)*4 makes b go up by 4s. b will be 0,0,0,0,4,4,4,4,8,8,8,8...

share|improve this answer
    
Which is, of course, what he wants (although b = x - a would work equally well, and probably be a bit faster). –  James Kanze Apr 17 at 16:21

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