Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As all known We can't modify a non-thread-safe collection while iterating it since it will throw a ConcurrentModificationException

But what I want to know is that what will happen if it would not throw a Exception and let the iteration and modification happened concurrently.

For example, remove an element from a HashMap while iterating it.

  1. Remove. Since remove operation would not change the length of the underlying table in the HashMap, I think that's not an issue to the iteration.

  2. Put. Maybe problem only occurs when the Put triggers resize() since the underlying table will be shuffled.

Is my analysis correct?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Short answer: no, your analysis is not correct.

If you remove something from a collection while you're iterating over it (without using the iterator), the iterator doesn't have a good way to keep track of where it is. Use a simpler example: List. Say the iterator is at index 10, and you remove index 5. That removal shifts all of the indices. Now you call next() on the iterator, and you.. what? Go to index 11? Stay at index 10? The iterator has no way to know.

Similarly, if you add something to a collection while you're iterating over it (without using the iterator), the iterator doesn't know if that was added before or after the current index, so the next() function is broken.

This doesn't even get into data structures where the iterator order depends on what's in the collection, but the issues are similar to the ones I listed above.

share|improve this answer
    
I assume you mean ArrayList - you can't really say too much about List, since it's an interface. –  Dukeling Apr 17 at 16:47
    
Eh, I think everything I said is generic enough that it applies to most data structures, not to mention most Lists. "Don't modify a collection while you're iterating over it" goes for all types of Lists. –  Kevin Workman Apr 17 at 16:52

But what I want to know is that what will happen if it would not throw a Exception and let the iteration and modification happened concurrently.

This is hypothetical because the respective (non-concurrent) collections don't work that way. If we hypothesize that they did allow "concurrent" modification, then we still cannot answer without making assumptions about how iteration would then be implemented. Finally, assuming that we just removed the fast-fail tests, then the behaviour will be collection specific.

Looking at your analysis for the HashMap case, you have to consider the internal state of the iterator object. I haven't looked at any specific implementation code, but a typical HashMap iterator will have an index for a hash chain in the main hash array, and a pointer to a node within the hash chain:

  • A Map.remove won't change the hashmap size, so the chain index won't be invalidated. However, if the wrong entry was removed, we could find that the iterator's node pointer could refer to a node that is no longer in the chain. This could cause the iteration to return deleted map entries.

  • You are correct that a Map.put that triggered a resize could cause the entries to be redistributed. This could cause some entries to be skipped, and others to be returned twice.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.