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I was looking at some code by an individual and noticed he seems to have a pattern in his functions:

<return-type> function(<params>)
{
 <initialization>

 do
 {
   <main code for function>
 }
 while(false);

 <tidy-up & return>
}

It's not bad, more peculiar (the actual code is fairly neat and unsurprising). It's not something I've seen before and I wondered if anyone can think of any logic behind it - background in a different language perhaps?

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2  
Have you tried changing it to the "normal" version and seeing if it still compiles? If it fails to compile when written normally, the compiler error could give a clue as to why this was done. –  Mark Byers Feb 22 '10 at 20:55
11  
Why not ask the "individual" rather than asking us for guesses on his intention? –  anon Feb 22 '10 at 20:57
1  
Maybe his professor required he use a do...while() and he has used that code as a function template since. –  Hogan Feb 22 '10 at 21:01
5  
@Neil... I want to avoid looking dumb when I confront him and he explains the super-advanced C++ usage I never thought of. –  Mr. Boy Feb 22 '10 at 21:14
6  
There seems to be quite a few different answers already, can you ask the original author what their intentions were and post back? –  nevets1219 Feb 22 '10 at 21:25

21 Answers 21

up vote 86 down vote accepted

You can break out of do{...}while(false).

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60  
+1 because that's probably the intent of the code, but doing something like this is just an idiotically disguised goto. If you think a goto is the right tool for the job, then you should just use a #$(*#@ goto. –  dsimcha Feb 22 '10 at 20:55
36  
It's more than a disguised goto. It is a restricted (structured) goto. –  Thomas Eding Feb 22 '10 at 20:56
16  
In what way is it "restricted"? Only jumping forwards is hardly a "restriction". A goto is a goto, and dressing one up to make it look like it's not one is worse than just using a goto in the first place. –  Anon. Feb 22 '10 at 20:58
28  
@Anon.: Jumping forwards is a restriction on a goto, and jumping out is definitely a restriction. The real problem with gotos is spaghetti code, and a forward and out jump limits that greatly. –  David Thornley Feb 22 '10 at 21:01
25  
An actual loop is not semantically a goto. A conditional is not semantically a goto. "Go to the end of the function and do the cleanup code" is semantically a goto. Use gotos when the semantics apply, don't dress up something semantically different because you're scared of them. –  Anon. Feb 22 '10 at 21:02

A lot of people point out that it's often used with break as an awkward way of writing "goto". That's probably true if it's written directly in the function.

In a macro, OTOH, do { something; } while (false) is a convenient way to FORCE a semicolon after the macro invocation, absolutely no other token is allowed to follow.

And another possibility is that there either once was a loop there or iteration is anticipated to be added in the future (e.g. in test-driven development, iteration wasn't needed to pass the tests, but logically it would make sense to loop there if the function needed to be somewhat more general than currently required)

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5  
+1 for mentioning the utility of this in macros; I'm surprised no one else mentioned that! –  Nick Meyer Feb 22 '10 at 21:28
7  
Yep, the macro thing is actually a perfectly valid usage of this. Of course, outside macros, it is just silly... ;) –  jalf Feb 22 '10 at 21:40
9  
It's not awkward, it's useful, because it's a Scoped goto - it means that any variables you declare in the do loop get destroyed, whereas the goto doesn't do that. –  Paul Betts Feb 22 '10 at 23:06
2  
@Paul: Nothing prevents you from adding braces around a bunch of statements to force this behavior with goto. –  erikkallen Feb 23 '10 at 11:57
3  
@Paul: goto out of a block most definitely causes local variables to be destroyed in C++, same as break. And in C variables aren't really destroyed, their stack space is simply reclaimed. –  Ben Voigt Feb 23 '10 at 16:00

The break as goto is probably the answer, but I will put forward one other idea.

Maybe he wanted to have a locally defined variables and used this construct to get a new scope.

Remember while recent C++ allows for {...} anywhere, this was not always the case.

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22  
He could have just used curly braces in that case. –  Nemanja Trifunovic Feb 22 '10 at 21:16
2  
@Nemanja, you'd be surprised at how many developers don't know that and try something related to what Hogan is suggesting –  Polaris878 Feb 22 '10 at 21:24
3  
@Polaris @Nemanja, it wasn't til I had been programming in C/C++ like 4 years that I figured out you can create a new local scope {} anywhere.. This is especially handy in switch-case code –  Earlz Feb 22 '10 at 21:37
1  
@Nemanja: I don't know exactly when, but I'm sure the {...} anywhere is a more modern development in C++ (remember the first C++ I used was implemented with a pre-processor and that did not allow this modern usage.) Maybe the author was just way old school. –  Hogan Feb 22 '10 at 22:21
2  
When did it not allow for braces everywhere? I started programming like 15 years ago, and it was allowed then (both in my text book and in every compiler I tried). –  erikkallen Feb 23 '10 at 11:59

I've seen it used as a useful pattern when there are many potential exit points for the function, but the same cleanup code is always required regardless of how the function exits.

It can make a tiresome if/else-if tree a lot easier to read, by just having to break whenever an exit point is reached, with the rest of the logic inline afterwards.

This pattern is also useful in languages that don't have a goto statement. Perhaps that's where the original programmer learnt the pattern.

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12  
Then just use an honest, straightforward goto instead of a thinly disguised goto. –  dsimcha Feb 22 '10 at 20:56
2  
I like this way better. It is easy to read and doesn't carry the stigma of a goto. –  Cameron Feb 22 '10 at 20:57
6  
gotos are perfectly easy to read if used sparingly and locally. They got their stigma from back when they were the main form of flow control and were jumping across hundreds of lines. –  dsimcha Feb 22 '10 at 20:59
9  
Not using goto because of a "stigma" is a sure sign of cargo-cult programming. –  Anon. Feb 22 '10 at 20:59
6  
Not to mention that a mass of cleanup code is a bad smell. This being C++, cleanup code should normally be in destructors called during RAII processing. –  David Thornley Feb 22 '10 at 21:02

I've seen code like that so you can use break as a goto of sorts.

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This is just a perversion of while to get the sematics of goto tidy-up without using the word goto.

It's bad form because when you use other loops inside the outer while the breaks become ambiguous to the reader. "Is this supposed to goto exit? or is this intended only to break out of the inner loop?"

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It looks like a C programmer. In C++, automatic variables have destructors which you use to clean up, so there should not be anything needed tidying up before the return. In C, you didn't have this RAII idiom, so if you have common clean up code, you either goto it, or use a once-through loop as above.

Its main disadvantage compared with the C++ idiom is that it will not tidy up if an exception is thrown in the body. C didn't have exceptions, so this wasn't a problem, but it does make it a bad habit in C++.

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It is a very common practice. In C. I try to think of it as if you want to lie to yourself in a way "I'm not using a goto". Thinking about it, there would be nothing wrong with a goto used similarly. In fact it would also reduce indentation level.

That said, though, I noticed, very often this do..while loops tend to grow. And then they get ifs and elses inside, rendering the code actually not very readable, let alone testable.

Those do..while are normally intended to do a clean-up. By all means possible I would prefer to use RAII and return early from a short function. On the other hand, C doesn't provide you as much conveniences as C++ does, making a do..while one of the best approaches to do a cleanup.

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This trick is used by programmers that are too shy to use an explicit goto in their code. The author of the above code wanted to have the ability to jump directly to the "cleanup and return" point from the middle of the code. But they didn't want to use a label and explicit goto. Instead, they can use a break inside the body of the above "fake" cycle to achieve the same effect.

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Maybe it’s used so that break can be used inside to abort the execution of further code at any point:

do {
    if (!condition1) break;
    some_code;
    if (!condition2) break;
    some_further_code;
    // …
} while(false);
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7  
Doing so seems like an attempt to avoid using goto just because someone heard it's "bad". –  Anon. Feb 22 '10 at 20:55
1  
Perhaps, but C++ has exceptions for this very reason. –  T.E.D. Feb 22 '10 at 21:25

I think this is done to use break or continue statements. Some kind of "goto" code logic.

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It's simple: Apparently you can jump out of the fake loop at any time using the break statement. Furthermore, the do block is a separate scope (which could also be achieved with { ... } only).

In such a situation, it might be a better idea to use RAII (objects automatically destructing correctly when the function ends). Another similar construct is the use of goto - yes, I know it's evil, but it can be used to have common cleanup code like so:

<return-type> function(<params>)
{
 <initialization>

 <main code for function using "goto error;" if something goes wrong>

 <tidy-up in success case & return>

 error:

 <commmon tidy-up actions for error case & return error code or throw exception>
}

(As an aside: The do-while-false construct is used in Lua to come up for the missing continue statement.)

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I think it's more convenient to write break instead of goto end. You don't even have to think up a name for the label which makes the intention clearer: You don't want to jump to a label with a specific name. You want to get out of here.

Also chances are you would need the braces anyway. So this is the do{...}while(false); version:

do {
   // code
   if (condition) break; // or continue
   // more code
} while(false);

And this is the way you would have to express it if you wanted to use goto:

{
   // code
   if (condition) goto end;
   // more code
}
end:

I think the meaning of the first version is much easier to grasp. Also it's easier to write, easier to extend, easier to translate to a language that doesn't support goto, etc.


The most frequently mentioned concern about the use of break is that it's a badly disguised goto. But actually break has more resemblance to return: Both instructions jump out of a block of code which is pretty much structured in comparison to goto. Nevertheless both instructions allow multiple exit points in a block of code which can be confusing sometimes. After all I would try to go for the most clear solution, whatever that is in the specific situation.

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Oh, I just noticed that I didn't understand the question completely before answering. I thought it was about the use of do{ ... }while(false); in general. But actually it's about using it to emulate some kind of try{ ... }finally{ ... }. –  Robert Jun 19 '12 at 13:14

How old was the author?

I ask because I once came across some real-time Fortran code that did that, back in the late 80's. It turns out that is a really good way to simulate threads on an OS that doesn't have them. You just put the entire program (your scheduler) in a loop, and call your "thread" routines" one by one. The thread routines themselves are loops that iterate until one of a number of conditions happen (often one being a certain amount of time has passed). It is "cooperative multitasking", in that it is up to the individual threads to give up the CPU every now and then so the others don't get starved. You can nest the looping subprogram calls to simulate thread priority bands.

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In addition to the already mentioned 'goto examples', the do ... while (0) idiom is sometimes used in a macro definition to provide for brackets in the definition and still have the compiler work with adding a semi colon to the end of a macro call.

http://groups.google.com/group/comp.soft-sys.ace/browse_thread/thread/52f670f1292f30a4?tvc=2&q=while+(0)

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This is amusing. There are probably breaks inside the loop as others have said. I would have done it this way :

while(true)
{
   <main code for function>
   break; // at the end.
}
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2  
With a potential of looping forever? do..while(false) exits always, while(true) is more on a risky side. –  Dmitry Feb 22 '10 at 21:44
1  
while(true) is the correct idiom in most languages. You'll often find it in GUI applications as the program's main loop. Because you're basically assuming the program shouldn't die until it is told to do so, a do..while(false) would cause all sorts of contrived logic. This approach may be more risqué from a perfectionist POV, but it is semantically easier and thus less error prone for human programmers (sorry, Skynet). –  pluma Feb 22 '10 at 22:30
2  
@dmitry do{...}while(false) is exactly same as while(true){ .. break;} –  N 1.1 Mar 10 '10 at 9:18
2  
@N1.1: Not in the presence of continue, they aren't the same. –  Ben Voigt May 2 '12 at 4:42

I agree with most posters about the usage as a thinly disguised goto. Macros have also been mentioned as a potential motivation for writing code in the style.

I have also seen this construct used in mixed C/C++ environments as a poor man's exception. The "do {} while(false)" with a "break" can be used to skip to the end of the code block should something that would normally warrant an exception be encountered in the loop.

I have also sen this construct used in shops where the "single return per function" ideology is enforced. Again, this is in lieu of an explicit "goto" - but the motivation is to avoid multiple return points, not to "skip over" code and continue actual execution within that function.

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I work with Adobe InDesign SDK, and the InDesign SDK examples have almost every function written like this. It is due to fact that the function are usually really long. Where you need to do QueryInterface(...) to get anything from the application object model. So usually every QueryInterface is followed by if not went well, break.

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Many have already stated the similarity between this construct and a goto, and expressed a preference for the goto. Perhaps this person's background included an environment where goto's were strictly forbidden by coding guidelines?

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The other reason I can think of is that it decorates the braces, whereas I believe in a newer C++ standard naked braces are not okay (ISO C doesn't like them). Otherwise to quiet a static analyzer like lint.

Not sure why you'd want them, maybe variable scope, or advantage with a debugger.

See Trivial Do While loop, and Braces are Good from C2.

To clarify my terminology (which I believe follows standard usage):

Naked braces:

init();
...
{
c = NULL;
mkwidget(&c);
finishwidget(&c);
}
shutdown();

Empty braces (NOP):

{}

e.g.

while (1)
   {}  /* Do nothing, endless loop */

Block:

if (finished)
{
     closewindows(&windows);
     freememory(&cache);
}

which would become

if (finished)
     closewindows(&windows);
freememory(&cache);

if the braces are removed, thus altering the flow of execution, not just the scope of local variables. Thus not 'freestanding' or 'naked'.

Naked braces or a block may be used to signify any section of code that might be a potential for an (inline) function that you wish to mark, but not refactor at that time.

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Really? That's a shame. One of the few things I liked about C was that it let you declare a new nested scope just about anywhere. –  T.E.D. Feb 22 '10 at 21:29
1  
Naked braces are occasionally helpful to fix weird crashes. See blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2004/05/20/135841.aspx . –  Brian Feb 22 '10 at 22:29
1  
In C++, a block (i.e. your "naked braces") can be used anywhere a single statement would be allowed. –  Ben Voigt May 2 '12 at 4:43
    
@BenVoigt Empty braces i.e. a NOP is different from a "naked braces" which is a block added around a linear sequence of instructions. E.g. ` printf("Hello"); { putchar(','); putchar(0x20); } printf("world!\n");` where the braces are not part of loop or branch control. –  mctylr May 10 '12 at 15:08
    
@mctylr: I wasn't talking about empty braces. –  Ben Voigt May 10 '12 at 19:55

It's a contrived way to emulate a GOTO as these two are practically identical:

// NOTE: This is discouraged!
do {
    if (someCondition) break;
    // some code be here
} while (false);
// more code be here

and:

// NOTE: This is discouraged, too!
if (someCondition) goto marker;
// some code be here
marker:
// more code be here

On the other hand, both of these should really be done with ifs:

if (!someCondition) {
    // some code be here
}
// more code be here

Although the nesting can get a bit ugly if you just turn a long string of forward-GOTOs into nested ifs. The real answer is proper refactoring, though, not imitating archaic language constructs.

If you were desperately trying to transliterate an algorithm with GOTOs in it, you could probably do it with this idiom. It's certainly non-standard and a good indicator that you're not adhering closely to the expected idioms of the language, though.

I'm not aware of any C-like language where do/while is an idiomatic solution for anything, actually.

You could probably refactor the whole mess into something more sensible to make it more idiomatic and much more readable.

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Alan, do..while(false) is not for running "undefined" number of times, it is for running once. –  Dmitry Feb 22 '10 at 23:44
2  
It is running an undefined number of times if you have a conditional continue statement at the end like I showed. By undefined I simply mean that you don't know whether it's running more than once unless you can predict whether the conditions will be met at a specific iteration. Without any continues in it, do..while(false) will run once, but also without any breaks in it, while(true) will run forever, so the "default behaviour" isn't really relevant to understand what can be done with the loops. –  pluma Feb 23 '10 at 11:32
    
It's useful when you define a macro that has multiple statements. If you wrap them in a do / while(false) you can use the macro in an if/else statement like any other function call. see noveltheory.com/TechPapers/while.htm for an explanation –  John Paquin Apr 25 '12 at 20:07
2  
Someone doesn't understand the semantics of continue. continue does NOT repeat the loop. "The continue statement shall occur only in an iteration-statement and causes control to pass to the loop-continuation portion of the smallest enclosing iteration-statement, that is, to the end of the loop." –  Ben Voigt May 2 '12 at 4:40
    
-1, the top two statements are not identical for the reasons that @BenVoigt points out. –  cmh Aug 14 '13 at 10:59

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