Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a custom class ModelWorkspace which derives from the Border and I've used it in my XAML as below:

XAML

<workspaces:ModelWorkspace x:Name="ModelWorkspace" ClipToBounds="True">
    <Canvas x:Name="ModelWindow" Width="0" Height="0">
    </Canvas>                
</workspaces:ModelWorkspace>

Custom Class

public class ModelWorkspace : Border
{
}

Now I want to write a constructor in this custom class and somehow access the child element of this custom class which is Canvas: ModelWindow in this case and then add a new Canvas to this child element.

public class ModelWorkspace : Border
{
    public Canvas innerLayer { get; set; }

    public ModelWorkspace()
    {
        innerLayer = new Canvas();
        // Get the child element here and add the
        // innerLayer as its child.
    }
}

So the final result should look something like this:

<workspaces:ModelWorkspace x:Name="ModelWorkspace" ClipToBounds="True">
    <Canvas x:Name="ModelWindow" Width="0" Height="0">
        <Canvas> // this is the inner layer we added by code.
        </Canvas>
    </Canvas>                
</workspaces:ModelWorkspace>

Update:

<Window x:Class="CustomClass.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:customClass="clr-namespace:CustomClass"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <customClass:ModelWorkspace>
            <Canvas x:Name="ModelWindow" Width="0" Height="0">
            </Canvas>
        </customClass:ModelWorkspace>
    </Grid>
</Window>

using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;

namespace CustomClass
{
    public class ModelWorkspace : Border
    {
        public Canvas innerLayer { get; set; }

        public ModelWorkspace()
        {
            innerLayer = new Canvas();

            // Add "innerLayer" to the canvas defined as the child of this ModelWorkspace.
            var childCanvas = Child as Canvas;
            if (childCanvas != null)
            {
                childCanvas.Children.Add(innerLayer);
                MessageBox.Show("This worked!");
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you have inherited from Border, which further inherits from Decorator, you can access the child element of your control with the Decorator.Child property.

public ModelWorkspace()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    innerLayer = new Canvas();

    // Add "innerLayer" to the canvas defined as the child of this ModelWorkspace.
    var childCanvas = Child as Canvas;
    if (childCanvas != null)
    {
        childCanvas.Children.Add(innerLayer);
    }
    // else the child is not a canvas.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks SpikeX, it gives me a minor warning that I'm calling virtual member in cosntructor, var childCanvas = Child as Canvas; But it is not big deal. it is working. –  Vahid Apr 17 at 19:03
1  
@Vahid I believe it's because Child may or may not be initialized since it's virtual. If you want to remedy this, you could check if Child != null before continuing, but since it's your own control, you would know if Child was set or not via the XAML. :) –  SpikeX Apr 17 at 19:10
    
Yes, it won't be null. Thanks for the big help. –  Vahid Apr 17 at 19:12
    
Sorry SpikeX I guess I was wrong this is not working :( I updated the question with the complete code so you can check it easily. The message inside the constructor is never executed. –  Vahid Apr 17 at 19:48
    
Debug the application. What is Child set to, and what is childCanvas set to after the cast? Is it null? If so, then Child is not actually a Canvas for some reason. –  SpikeX Apr 17 at 20:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.