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I am trying to run a command, get it's output, then later run another command in the same environment (say if I set an environment variable in the first command, I want it to be available to the second command). I tried this:

import subprocess

process = subprocess.Popen("/bin/bash", shell=True, stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE);

process.stdin.write("export MyVar=\"Test\"\n")
process.stdin.write("echo $MyVar\n")
process.stdin.flush()

stdout, stderr  = process.communicate()
print "stdout: " + str(stdout)

# Do it again
process.stdin.write("echo $MyVar\n")
process.stdin.flush()

stdout, stderr = process.communicate()
print "stdout: " + str(stdout)

but communicate() reads until the end, so this is not a valid technique. (I get this:)

stdout: Test

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "./MultipleCommands.py", line 15, in <module>
    process.stdin.write("echo $MyVar\n")
ValueError: I/O operation on closed file

I have seen this: http://stackoverflow.com/a/15654218/284529 , but it doesn't give a working example of how to do what it proposes. Can anyone demonstrate how to do this? I have also seen other techniques that involve constantly checking for output in a loop, but this doesn't fit the "get the output of a command" mentality - it is just treating it like a stream.

share|improve this question
    
For the specific example you're talking about, it sounds like you'd be better of using the env kwarg that Popen takes: Popen("echo $MyVar"], env={"MyVar": "Test"}). –  dano Apr 17 at 19:54
    
@dano You're right. In a real case I might want to start an ssh session, and keep it open and keep issuing commands to it to avoid the overhead of making a new connection for each command. –  David Doria Apr 17 at 20:37
    
In that case, I'd recommend using paramiko: github.com/paramiko/paramiko –  dano Apr 17 at 20:42
    
Could you answer a question for my personal survey: what place in the subprocess documentation made you thing that process.communicate() may be called more than once for the same process? For interactive usage, pexpect is more suitable than subprocess. If you want to run commands over ssh; consider using fabric as a library (it is more high-level than paramiko). –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 17 at 23:02
    
Nothing made me explicitly think that it was ok, it just seemed like the only thing I could find in subprocess that "got the output of a command", versus just read indefinitely from a pipe. I'll look into 'fabric', thanks. –  David Doria Apr 18 at 11:27

4 Answers 4

communicate and wait methods of Popen objects, close the PIPE after the process returns. If you want stay in communication with the process try something like this:

import subprocess

process = subprocess.Popen("/bin/bash", shell=True, stdin=subprocess.PIPE,       stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE);

process.stdin.write("export MyVar=\"Test\"\n")
process.stdin.write("echo $MyVar\n")
process.stdin.flush()

proc.stdout.readline()

process.stdin.write("echo $MyVar\n")
process.stdin.flush()

stdout, stderr = process.communicate()
print "stdout: " + str(stdout)

I think you misunderstand communicate...

Take a look over this link:- http://docs.python.org/library/subprocess.html#subprocess.Popen.communicate

communicate sends a string to the other process and then waits on it to finish... (Like you said waits for the EOF listening to the stdout & stderror)

What you should do instead is:

proc.stdin.write('message')

# ...figure out how long or why you need to wait...

proc.stdin.write('message2')

(and if you need to get the stdout or stderr you'd use proc.stdout or proc.stderr)

share|improve this answer
    
Moshin That will only get a single line that is output from the first command, right? –  David Doria Apr 17 at 20:29

When using communicate it sees that subprocess had ended, but in case you have a intermediate one (bash), when your sub-subprocess ends, you have to somehow signal manually.

As for the rest, a simplest approach is to just emit a marker line. However, I'm sorry to disappoint you here but pooling (i.e. constantly checking in a loop) is actually the only sane option. If you don't like the loop, you could "hide" it away in a function.

import subprocess
import time

def readlines_upto(stream, until="### DONE ###"):
    while True:
        line = stream.readline()
        if line is None:
            time.sleep(0.1)
            continue
        if line.rstrip() == until:
            break
        yield line

process = subprocess.Popen("/bin/bash", shell=True,
    stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
process.stdin.write("export MyVar=\"Test\"\n")
process.stdin.write("echo $MyVar\n")
process.stdin.write("echo '### DONE ###'\n")
process.stdin.flush()

# Note, I don't read stderr here, so if subprocess outputs too much there,
# it'll fill the pipe and stuck. If you don't need stderr data, don't
# redirect it to a pipe at all. If you need it, make readlines read two pipes.
stdout = "".join(line for line in readlines_upto(process.stdout))
print "stdout: " + stdout

# Do it again
process.stdin.write("echo $MyVar\n")
process.stdin.flush()
stdout, stderr = process.communicate()
print "stdout: " + str(stdout)
share|improve this answer

As per the manual:

Popen.communicate(input=None)

    Interact with process: Send data to stdin. Read data from stdout and stderr, until end-of-file is reached. Wait for process to terminate. [...]

You need to read from the pipe instead:

import os
stdout = os.read(process.stdout.fileno(), 1024)
print "stdout: " + stdout

If there's no data waiting, it will hang there forever or until data is ready to be read. You should use the select system call to prevent that:

import select
import os

try:
    i,o,e = select.select([process.stdout], [], [], 5) # 5 second timeout
    stdout = os.read(i[0].fileno(), 1024)
except IndexError:
    # nothing was written to the pipe in 5 seconds
    stdout = ""

print "stdout: " + stdout

If you want to fetch multiple writes, to avoid race conditions, you'll have to put it in a loop:

stdout = ""
while True:
    try:
        i,o,e = select.select([process.stdout], [], [], 5) # 5 second timeout
        stdout += os.read(i[0].fileno(), 1024)
    except IndexError:
        # nothing was written to the pipe in 5 seconds, we're done here
        break
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this, but if there is more than one line per command it only seems to put the first line into stdout. For example: gist.github.com/daviddoria/fac54d3e8f2e01d21036 –  David Doria Apr 17 at 20:36
    
This is because there may be a delay between when it is written and read from the pipe. Per example, if I run your gist locally, sometimes I get one line, sometimes two. It's a race condition. To avoid it, you need to put it in a loop and break if the timeout is reached. Without knowing in advance the amount of data you're going to receive in advance, the only thing you can do is rely on a timeout. I updated the answer. –  netcoder Apr 17 at 20:44

To get the output of multiple commands, just combine them into a single script:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import subprocess
import sys

output = subprocess.check_output("""
export MyVar="Test"
echo $MyVar
echo ${MyVar/est/ick}
""", shell=True, executable='/bin/bash', universal_newlines=True)
sys.stdout.write(output)

Output

Test
Tick
share|improve this answer
    
Sebastian But then you don't know which part of the output corresponds to each command. –  David Doria Apr 21 at 11:56
    
@DavidDoria: But using p.stdin/p.stdout directly doesn't provide this info also (how do you how many lines should you read for a given command?) –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 21 at 12:47

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