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I need to find elements of a vector that are less than one of more elements that come after it. It's easy to do in a loop:

x = some_vector_values;
for m = 1 : length(x)
  if( any( x(m+1:end) > x(m) )
    do_such_and_such;
  end
end

but the speed is killing me. I'm scratching my head trying to come up with an efficient work-around but am coming up blank. The array length can be on the order of thousands and I need to do this for many different arrays.

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2  
can't you first sort the vector? Then for sure you know that the numbers after a specific number are smaller (bigger) than that. –  NKN Apr 17 '14 at 20:32
    
Some sample input and output to showcase your requirements? –  Divakar Apr 17 '14 at 20:33
    
Try running the profiler, what causes the major cpu time, the loop / condition or "do_such_and_such"? What dimension is x? –  Daniel Apr 17 '14 at 20:40
1  
I concur with @NKN. Note that sort can also return the original indices of the sorted element. –  dustincarr Apr 17 '14 at 20:44
1  
@Daniel It's the if comparison within the loop. –  AnonSubmitter85 Apr 17 '14 at 20:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your algorithm is so slow since if any(...)has to check n items on the first iteration, then n-1 items on the second iteration ... until checking a single item in the last iteration. Overal it thus has to do roughly n^2/2 comparisons, so its running time is quadratic as a function of the length of the input vector!

One solution that is linear in time and memory might be to first calculate a vector with the maximum from that point until the end, which can be calculated in one backwards pass (you could call this a reversed cumulative maximum, which cannot be vectorized). After this, this vector is compared directly to x (untested):

% calculate vector mx for which mx(i) = max(x(i:end))
mx = zeros(size(x));
mx(end) = x(end);
for i = length(x)-1:-1:1 % iterate backwards
    mx(i) = max(x(i), mx(i+1));
end

for i = 1:length(x) - 1
    if mx(i) > x(i)
        do_such_and_such(i);
    end
end

In case you don't care about the order in which do_such_and_such is executed, these for loops can even be combined like so:

mx = x(end);
for i = length(x)-1:-1:1 % iterate backwards
    if x(i) < mx
        do_such_and_such(i);
    end
    mx = max(x(i), mx); % maximum of x(i:end)
end
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Thank you. I got several good answers, but this one was both simple and the fastest. Tremendously helpful, and not just for this specific problem; I feel like I learned something for future reference. –  AnonSubmitter85 Apr 18 '14 at 22:47

This uses a divide-and-conquer approach (similar to binary search):

  1. Find the maximum of the vector.
  2. All elements to its left are accepted, whereas the maximum itself is rejected.
  3. For those elements to the right of the maximum, apply step 1.

Although I haven't done a careful analysis, I think average complexity is O(n), or at most O(n log n). Memory is O(n).

The result is a logical vector ind that contains true for accepted elements and false for rejected elements. The final result would be x(ind).

x = [3 4 3 5 6 3 4 1];
n = numel(x);
ind = false(1,n); %// intiallization
s = 1; %// starting index of the part of x that remains to be analyzed
while s <= n %// if s > n we have finished
    [~, m] = max(x(s:end)); %// index of maximum within remaining part of x
    ind(s:s-2+m) = true; %// elements to its left are accepted
    s = s+m; %// update start of remaining part
end

Running time could be reduced a little by changing the while condition to while s < n, because the last element is always rejected.

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Yes! This must be the logic for higher data! +1 –  Divakar Apr 17 '14 at 21:34
    
I guess this is O(n log(n)) running time overall, not O(log(n)). I think my solution is O(n). –  Bas Swinckels Apr 17 '14 at 22:29
    
@BasSwinckels You're right, finding the max introduces a linear factor. Corrected –  Luis Mendo Apr 17 '14 at 23:17
    
@BasSwinckels On second thought, perhaps it's O(n). On average, I compute the maximum of n elements, then of n/2 elements, then of n/4 elements... which sums 2*n –  Luis Mendo Apr 18 '14 at 0:22
1  
You are probably correct, it should be O(n) in the optimal case (maximum at end) and average case (like you explained), but O(n^2) in the worst case (when x is strictly decreasing). –  Bas Swinckels Apr 18 '14 at 6:34

This should be an algorithm that takes O(n) time and O(n) memory: Label the last element in your array the maximum element. Iterate backwards over the array. Whenever you have an element smaller than your maximum, save it. Otherwise, it becomes your new maximum. This should get you all of the elements you need with a single pass.

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One-liner version

comparisons = any(triu(bsxfun(@gt,x(:).',x(:))),2)
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For large vectors (numel(x)=10000) this solution is slower. –  Daniel Apr 17 '14 at 21:10
1  
thats not surprising... one needs to host a 1e5 by 1e5 matrices in memory... –  bla Apr 17 '14 at 21:13
    
@Daniel It's because you are stretching bsxfun there, as pointed out by @natan. –  Divakar Apr 17 '14 at 21:14
    
Thank you. Even if not ideal in the worst case, this is much much much faster in most cases and has been extremely helpful. –  AnonSubmitter85 Apr 17 '14 at 22:00
    
@AnonSubmitter85 Awesome! Faster with smaller datasizes I am guessing! –  Divakar Apr 17 '14 at 22:03

If you would like to find elements that are less than some element to its right, you can do this also:

x = some_values'; % x should be a column vector to use this
h = hankel(x);
m = max(h,[],2);
f = find(x<m) %returns indices or f = (a<m) %returns true/false

The hankel matrix will show the elements to the right as it goes down the rows.

Then you can use the indices or true/false to iterate through a for loop and perform some operations. Here is an example:

x =

     9
     8
    16
    16
     4
    10
     9
    13
    15
     1

>> h = hankel(x)

h =

     9     8    16    16     4    10     9    13    15     1
     8    16    16     4    10     9    13    15     1     0
    16    16     4    10     9    13    15     1     0     0
    16     4    10     9    13    15     1     0     0     0
     4    10     9    13    15     1     0     0     0     0
    10     9    13    15     1     0     0     0     0     0
     9    13    15     1     0     0     0     0     0     0
    13    15     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
    15     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

>> m = max(h,[],2)

m =

    16
    16
    16
    16
    15
    15
    15
    15
    15
     1

>> f = find(a<m)

f =

     1
     2
     5
     6
     7
     8
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This solution uses O(n^2) memory. –  Bas Swinckels Apr 17 '14 at 22:48

@NKN has it right. Sort.

x = some_vector_values;  

[Y,I]=sort(x);  %sort in order, get indices
dy=gradient(Y); %get difference vector same size as input vector
ind=find(dy~=0);%ignore places that are equal to the value of interest

for m = 1 : length(ind)
    do_such_and_such to Y(ind(m));
end

Best of luck

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Sorting takes O(n log(n)) time, i think you can do better ... –  Bas Swinckels Apr 17 '14 at 22:44
    
Maybe I am missing something obvious, but I don't see how this would work. There are two criterion: 1) A > B, and 2) A is to the right of B. –  AnonSubmitter85 Apr 17 '14 at 22:48
    
@BasSwinckels - for compiled software yes. For interpreted - maybe not. The sort builtin is likely compiled, your script - notsomuch. I've seen compiled run 1000x faster than interpreted, but your mileage can vary. The speed comparison between a compiled sort versus an interpreted sort when form is O(n log(n)) is O( 1000*n log(1000*n) / n log(n) ) or about 3000 * O(n log(n)). The builtins are screaming fast. –  EngrStudent Apr 17 '14 at 23:25
1  
Matlab has a pretty good JIT these days, which especially for simple loops should come to within a small factor of compiled code. This constant factor might be smaller than log(n) for big arrays. –  Bas Swinckels Apr 17 '14 at 23:36
    
This answer does not satisfy the criterion of problem. –  AnonSubmitter85 Apr 18 '14 at 15:47

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