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I have the following hash:

my %HASH = (
    'List1' =>  [ 'the', 'red', 'cat', 'jumps' ],
    'List2' =>  [ 'the', 'brown', 'fox', 'jumps' ],
    'List3' =>  [ 'a', 'red', 'fox', 'jumps' ],
);

I want to delete duplicate elements across these arrays, so that only unique elements remain. The desired output would be the following:

my %HASH = (
    'List1' =>  [ 'cat' ],
    'List2' =>  [ 'brown' ],
    'List3' =>  [ 'a' ],
);

In other words, if an element is present in both List1 and List2, it should be deleted from both lists.

I have tried to do the following:

use strict;
use warnings;
use diagnostics;
use Data::Dumper;

foreach my $key ( keys %HASH )  {

    foreach ( @{$HASH{$key}} )  {

        if(exists($HASH{$key})){
            @{$HASH{$key}} = delete($HASH{$key});
        }
    }
}

print Dumper(\%HASH);

Which doesn't seem to do anything, the hash remains the way it was. I'm still pretty new to Perl, so I'm not sure where I went wrong with that. But Perldoc says that calling exists on array values is deprecated anyway, so any solution which uses something other than exists is welcome too!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
use strict;
use warnings;

my %hash = (
    'List1' =>  [ 'the', 'red', 'cat', 'jumps' ],
    'List2' =>  [ 'the', 'brown', 'fox', 'jumps' ],
    'List3' =>  [ 'a', 'red', 'fox', 'jumps' ],
);

# first, we count all words
my %count;
for my $words (values %hash) {
    for my $word (@$words) {
        $count{$word}++;
    }
}

# Now, we filter the words with `grep` so that only
# those remain which were found once
for my $words (values %hash) {
    @$words = grep { $count{$_} == 1 } @$words;
}

use Data::Dump;
dd \%hash;

Outputs:

{ List1 => ["cat"], List2 => ["brown"], List3 => ["a"] }
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1  
Correct and elegant. I would write the same code, but this map and grep and statement modifier for and @$_ is probably quite confusing for a Perl beginner – you might want to rewrite the answer to a more explicit form with more explanations (or I'll do it, if you are OK with that). –  amon Apr 17 '14 at 22:30
    
@amon Write away. :) Yes, this is probably too perl-ish for a beginner, but it was too much fun not to throw out there. Feel free to either edit (always welcome), or just post your own more teachable answer, and I'll gladly vote yours up. –  Miller Apr 17 '14 at 22:33
    
I would indeed appreciate an explanation of what @$_ means here :) But this answer works great, despite being a bit confusing! –  kormak Apr 17 '14 at 22:46
    
@kormak Amon's for edited version does the exact same thing as my previous code. This version simply uses named variables instead of a slight overuse of localized $_. For your question, @$_ is equivalent to @$words. So in this case, we're grepping through the values of that array (accessed via the reference $words) and assigning back only those values that are unique. –  Miller Apr 17 '14 at 23:01
    
@Miller Thanks for the explanation! This version is indeed much easier to read :) –  kormak Apr 18 '14 at 16:15

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