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I'm having a hard time understanding and implementing Peterson's algorithm for N processes (also known as Filter algorithm). I'm trying to make a chat in C using shared memory. I'm using the version of the algorithm that can be found in Wikipedia:

// initialization
level[N] = { -1 };     // current level of processes 0...N-1
waiting[N-1] = { -1 }; // the waiting process of each level 0...N-2

// code for process #i
for(l = 0; l < N-1; ++l) {
    level[i] = l;
    waiting[l] = i;
    while(waiting[l] == i && (there exists k ≠ i, such that level[k] ≥ l)) {
        // busy wait
    }
}

// critical section

level[i] = -1; // exit section

I have a program called server.c and another called client.c, and I intend to use the algorithm so every client can access the shared memory at their own turn.

As I understand, my implementation of the algorithm should run inside every client. My question is: how do I know the amount of clients running (the value of N) if every client is a different instance of the program client.c? also, how do I know the value of i (i would be the number of the processes) if each new instance of client.c is unaware of how many instances have been run before?

Please let me know if my question is unclear, since English is not my native language.

Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
These structures are assumed to be in shared memory, so this will not work for separate program instances unless you flag the region the control variables are in as shared. Once you do that, though, you can have a counter that tells you how many concurrent users you have. – 500 - Internal Server Error Apr 18 '14 at 0:53
    
Thank you very much for your answer. Actually, I am using a part of the shared memory region for my control variables (I'm developing right now, so I don't know if it works yet). I'm worried though, because the control variables could be accessed concurrently by two or more different users at a given time - which is exactly the problem that the algorithm is trying to solve. So in order to use the algorithm to know how to access the shared memory region, I need to know the value of n in the shared memory region and viceversa... :S – Claude Monetim Apr 18 '14 at 1:04
> How do I know the amount of clients running (the value of N)
> if every client is a different instance of the program client.c? 

Peterson's solution requires that all participating processes, or threads, have access to a shared-memory resource. That shared memory segment will contain level[] and waiting[] arrays, as well as the value of N.

> also, how do I know the value of i (i would be the number of the process)
> if each new instance of client.c is unaware of how many instances have
> been run before?

In more primitive situations where there is a set number of participating processes, or threads, each is assigned it's 'i' value. The only requirement is that they are unique, and that i >= 0, and i < N. (Perhaps your implementation could assign 'i' from a command-line parameter?)

In more advanced implementations, each process might acquire (and then increment) 'i' in the shared memory segment. Of course, such an implementation would have to assure that each participant is started in a way that there is no contention for i.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! What I'm trying right now is to implement the "primitive" situation, assigning values to the processes. Thanks to your answer, I now know that I'm heading to the right direction. :) – Claude Monetim Apr 18 '14 at 1:41

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