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I am writing a very simple implementation of Observer pattern in C++. Because I want my Publisher to notify its subscribers with events that are different (e.g. not just a string, but a specific class), I have decided to use templates. My code is compiling fine, except that part that I don't know where to store all these Observers. If I use and std::list or std::vector, they will not allow to store specialized data, because their elements have to be the same. So my question is, how do I store all those observers in my Publisher class. Here is my code:

Observer.hpp
#ifndef H_OBSERVER
#define H_OBSERVER    

#include <memory>

class Publisher;

template <class T>
class Observer
{
    protected:
    virtual void Notify(std::shared_ptr<Publisher> source, T info) = 0;
};

#endif

Publisher.hpp
#ifndef H_PUBLISHER
#define H_PUBLISHER

#include "Observer.hpp"
#include <list>
#include <string>
#include <memory>

class Publisher
{

public:
    template<class T>
    void NotifyObservers();

    template <class T>
    void AddObserver(std::shared_ptr<Observer<T>> &obs);

    template <class T>
    void RemoveObserver(std::shared_ptr<Observer<T>> &obs);

protected:
    //std::list<std::shared_ptr<Observer> m_observers;
};

#endif
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I was thinking I could store all my observers in an std::list, like the one you see in the code - std::list<std::shared_ptr<Observer> m_observers. But that resulted in a compilation error. –  armanali Apr 18 at 0:15
2  
How about having all Observer inherit publicly from a base class like ObserverBase and publisher keep a std::list<ObserverBase*>?Is that acceptable? –  Arun Apr 18 at 0:18
    
The problem is that when you have some data to send you need to know what Observer to inform. So it strikes me that perhaps you'd be better suited with something like the visitor pattern. –  qeadz Apr 18 at 0:19
    
@Arun, I can see cases where it can be used. But in my particular scenario it is the Observer class that is specialized. Because I want each observer to receive it's own notification. One of them can receive HardwareNotification, the other can receive ApplicationNotification, etc. And those can all be different classes, or even enums. –  armanali Apr 18 at 0:20
1  
Sure - here is one on StackOverflow even: stackoverflow.com/questions/2604169/… –  qeadz Apr 18 at 0:23

2 Answers 2

Save your observers in a standard container like std::vector.

For lifetime management and identification, use: std::weak_pointer,
for polymorphic function (objects), std::function,
and to put them together use std::pair.

That means you can scrap your non-standard Observer.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The initial solution I posted was not correct. It's because I am new to templates and did not know how to effectively utilize them. The solution I am posting now is a working one:

//IObserver.hpp
#pragma once
#include <memory>

template <class T>
class IObserver
{
public:
    virtual ~IObserver() {};
    virtual void Notify(T data) = 0;
protected:
};



//Observable.hpp
#pragma once

#include "IObserver.hpp"
#include <list>
#include <string>
#include <memory>

template<class T>
class Observable
{
public:
    void NotifyObservers(T data)
    {
        for (auto o : m_observers)
        {
            o.Notify(data);
        }
    }

    void AddObserver(std::shared_ptr<IObserver<T>> &obs)
    {
        m_observers.push_back(obs);
    }

    void RemoveObserver(std::shared_ptr<IObserver<T>> &obs)
    {
        m_observers.remove(obs);
    }

private:
    std::list<std::shared_ptr<IObserver<T>>> m_observers;
};
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