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I have a problem putting the content of pwd command into a shell variable that i'll use later. Here is my shell code (the loop doesn't stop):

#!/bin/bash
pwd= `pwd`
until [ $pwd = "/" ]
    do
        echo $pwd
        ls && cd .. && ls 
        $pwd= `pwd` 
    done

Could you spot my mistake please? Thanks a lot for your help ^^

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You could also add an escape hatch to your loops in case something goes wrong. e.g. i=0 oustide of the loop. then inside, i=$i + 1. And then also inside the loop, add something like if [ $i > 25 ] then; break; endif; I'm not sure of the loop breaking in syntax in shell scripts, but it should be something like that. –  Buttle Butkus Apr 18 '13 at 3:55
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5 Answers

up vote 56 down vote accepted

Try:

pwd=`pwd`

or

pwd=$(pwd)

Notice no spaces after the equals sign.

Also as Mr. Weiss points out; you don't assign to $pwd, you assign to pwd.

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great, thank you so much :) will definatly remember that no spaces and $ sign –  Zenet Feb 22 '10 at 22:34
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Here's your script...

DIR=$(pwd)
echo $DIR
while [ "$DIR" != "/" ]; do
    cd ..
    DIR=$(pwd)
    echo $DIR
done

Note the spaces, use of quotes, and $ signs.

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In this specific case, note that bash has a variable called PWD that contains the current directory: $PWD is equivalent to `pwd`. (So do other shells, this is a standard feature.) So you can write your script like this:

#!/bin/bash
until [ "$PWD" = "/" ]; do
  echo "$PWD"
  ls && cd .. && ls 
done

Note the use of double quotes around the variable references. They are necessary if the variable (here, the current directory) contains whitespace or wildcards (\[?*), because the shell splits the result of variable expansions into words and performs globbing on these words. Always double-quote variable expansions "$foo" and command substitutions "$(foo)" (unless you specifically know you have not to).

In the general case, as other answers have mentioned already:

  • You can't use whitespace around the equal sign in an assignment: var=value, not var = value
  • The $ means “take the value of this variable”, so you don't use it when assigning: var=value, not $var=value.
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You can also do way more complex commands, just to round out the examples above. So, say I want to get the number of processes running on the system and store it in the *${NUM_PROCS}* variable.

All you have to so is generate the command pipeline and stuff it's output (the process count) into the variable.

It looks something like this:

NUM_PROCS=$(ps -e | sed 1d | wc -l)

I hope that helps add some handy information to this discussion.

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Superstar, thanks helped me out.. –  Shawn Vader Sep 5 '13 at 9:35
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In shell you assign to a variable without the dollar-sign:

TEST=`pwd`
echo $TEST

that's better (and can be nested) but is not as portable as the backtics:

TEST=$(pwd)
echo $TEST

Always remember: the dollar-sign is only used when reading a variable.

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Thank you so much Johannes :) –  Zenet Feb 22 '10 at 22:35
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