Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Python how do I find all the missing days in a sorted list of dates?

share|improve this question
    
What types are your date objects? –  Mark Byers Feb 22 '10 at 23:24
    
@Mark: The type for date objects is datetime –  Vishal Feb 22 '10 at 23:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

using sets

>>> from datetime import date, timedelta
>>> d = [date(2010, 2, 23),date(2010, 2, 24),date(2010, 2, 25),
         date(2010, 2, 26),date(2010, 3, 1),date(2010, 3, 2)]
>>> date_set = set(d[0]+timedelta(x) for x in range((d[-1]-d[0]).days))
>>> missing = sorted(date_set-set(d))
>>> missing
[datetime.date(2010, 2, 27), datetime.date(2010, 2, 28)]
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Appreciate your responses, I like this one :) Thanks. –  Vishal Feb 23 '10 at 0:23

Sort the list of dates and iterate over it, remembering the previous entry. If the difference between the previous and current entry is more than one day, you have missing days.

Here's one way to implement it:

from datetime import date, timedelta
from itertools import tee, izip

def pairwise(iterable):
    "s -> (s0,s1), (s1,s2), (s2, s3), ..."
    a, b = tee(iterable)
    b.next()
    return izip(a, b)

def missing_dates(dates):
    for prev, curr in pairwise(sorted(dates)):
        i = prev
        while i + timedelta(1) < curr:
            i += timedelta(1)
            yield i

dates = [ date(2010, 1, 8),
          date(2010, 1, 2),
          date(2010, 1, 5),
          date(2010, 1, 1),
          date(2010, 1, 7) ]

for missing in missing_dates(dates):
    print missing

Output:

2010-01-03
2010-01-04
2010-01-06

Performance is O(n*log(n)) where n is the number of days in the span when the input is unsorted. As your list is already sorted, it will run in O(n).

share|improve this answer
    
The list of dates is already sorted –  gnibbler Feb 22 '10 at 23:36
    
@gnibbler: That's great... then this algorithm runs in O(n) time. –  Mark Byers Feb 22 '10 at 23:40
    
Mine is O(n) too. Had I not used date_set it would have had worst case performance of O(n*n) though :) –  gnibbler Feb 22 '10 at 23:51
>>> from datetime import datetime, timedelta
>>> date_list = [datetime(2010, 2, 23),datetime(2010, 2, 24),datetime(2010, 2, 25),datetime(2010, 2, 26),datetime(2010, 3, 1),datetime(2010, 3, 2)]
>>> 
>>> date_set=set(date_list)         # for faster membership tests than list
>>> one_day = timedelta(days=1)
>>> 
>>> test_date = date_list[0]
>>> missing_dates=[]
>>> while test_date < date_list[-1]:
...     if test_date not in date_set:
...         missing_dates.append(test_date)
...     test_date += one_day
... 
>>> print missing_dates
[datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 27, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 28, 0, 0)]

This also works for datetime.date objects, but the OP says the list is datetime.datetime objects

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Seems good. Nice touch with using the parameter name on the timedelta(days=1) for clarity. –  Mark Byers Feb 23 '10 at 0:10

Put the dates in a set and then iterate from the first date to the last using datetime.timedelta(), checking for containment in the set each time.

share|improve this answer
import datetime

DAY = datetime.timedelta(days=1)
# missing dates: a list of [start_date, end)
missing = [(d1+DAY, d2) for d1, d2 in zip(dates, dates[1:]) if (d2 - d1) > DAY]

def date_range(start_date, end, step=DAY):
    d = start_date
    while d < end:
        yield d
        d += step

missing_dates = [d for d1, d2 in missing for d in date_range(d1, d2)]
share|improve this answer

Using a list comprehension

>>> from datetime import date, timedelta
>>> d = [date(2010, 2, 23),date(2010, 2, 24),date(2010, 2, 25),date(2010, 2, 26),date(2010, 3, 1),date(2010, 3, 2)]
>>> date_set=set(d)
>>> missing = [x for x in (d[0]+timedelta(x) for x in range((d[-1]-d[0]).days)) if x not in date_set]

>>> missing
[datetime.date(2010, 2, 27), datetime.date(2010, 2, 28)]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.