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I have a front end page which has a a set of submit buttons and the snippet is :

<div class="table-outer">
<div class="table-inner">
<table>
<form action="addtocart" method="post" >    
<tr><td>IIT Jee Prep Combo pack</td><td><input type="submit" name="IIT Jee Prep Combo pack " value="Add to Cart"></td></tr>
</form>
<form action="addtocart" method="post">    
<tr><td>GRE Prep Combo Pack</td><td><input type="submit" name="GRE Prep Combo Pack" value="Add to Cart"></td></tr>
</form>
<form action="addtocart" method="post">    
<tr><td>GATE Prep Combo Pack </td><td><input type="submit" name="GATE Prep Combo Pack" value="Add to Cart" ></td></tr>
</form>
<form action="addtocart" method="post">    
<tr><td>CAT Prep Combo Pack</td><td><input type="submit" name"CAT Prep Combo Pack" value="Add to Cart"></td></tr>
</form>
<form action="addtocart" method="post">
<tr><td>Civil Services Prep Combo Pack</td><td><input type="submit" name="Civil Services Prep Combo Pack" value="Add to Cart"></td></tr>
</form>    
</table>
</div>
</div>

I have a Flask server handling all the requests. Now, I want to store the name of the book in a file when the user clicks. The name of the book is stored in the name attribute of the form tag. How can I perform this. If it were a text box, I did it with request.form['name']. How can the same be performed in case of a submit button

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2 Answers 2

The browser sends only the submit button used over to the server; you can test for that name in the request.form object:

if "Civil Services Prep Combo Pack" in request.form:
    # ...

or you could look for the form keys; there should be just one key in the form, which will be the name attribute of the submit button used:

book = form.keys()[0]

In other words, the name attribute of a submit button is the key of the submitted field; the associated value is always going to be 'Add to Cart' for your forms.

It'll be much easier to test for what form was used if you added a hidden field to each form:

<form action="addtocart" method="post">
<input type="hidden" name="book" value="Civil Services Prep Combo Pack" />
<tr><td>Civil Services Prep Combo Pack</td><td><input type="submit" name="add" value="Add to Cart"></td></tr>
</form>    

and use request.form['book'] to determine what form was used.

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Tried like this: @app.route('/addtocart', methods=['GET','POST']) def addtocart(): if request.method=='POST': book_ordered=request.form['book'] if book_ordered=="Five Point Someone": return render_template('Novellist.html') This is not working. The server says it a bad request. Help –  user3531196 Apr 18 '14 at 10:24
    
book_ordered=request.form['book'] is not responding. –  user3531196 Apr 18 '14 at 10:30
    
And what is the exception you get? KeyError perhaps? Did you check if your browser actually has a hidden input field to submit? You could do return str(request.form) in a view to test what exactly was submitted in your POST to help debug. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 18 '14 at 10:33
    
As far I know request.form[book] has to retrieve the value part of the form that is submitted. However, The browser (or proxy) sent a request that this server could not understand is popping out. –  user3531196 Apr 18 '14 at 10:42
    
When I use return str(request.form] , this gets returned : ImmutableMultiDict([('Five Point Someone', u'Add to Cart')]) –  user3531196 Apr 18 '14 at 10:47

Rather than overloading the submit button, I'd suggest putting the name of the book as a hidden tag. That way it'll be sent to the server, so you can do something like:

<input type="hidden" name="book_name" value="Name of Book here" /> 

and then access request.form['book_name'].

The other way to do this is via Javascript and overriding the submit method to know what submit button was clicked on.

Check out Flask-WTF and WTForms, by the way. You can create your forms programmatically, and I think it's a lot neater than coding forms by hand.

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Oops, I missed Martijn suggested a hidden tag, too. –  Rachel Sanders Apr 18 '14 at 19:51

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