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We're all familiar with the horror that is C# event declaration. To ensure thread-safety, the standard is to write something like this:

public event EventHandler SomethingHappened;
protected virtual void OnSomethingHappened(EventArgs e)
{            
    var handler = SomethingHappened;
    if (handler != null)
        handler(this, e);
}

Recently in some other question on this board (which I can't find now), someone pointed out that extension methods could be used nicely in this scenario. Here's one way to do it:

static public class EventExtensions
{
    static public void RaiseEvent(this EventHandler @event, object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var handler = @event;
        if (handler != null)
            handler(sender, e);
    }
    static public void RaiseEvent<T>(this EventHandler<T> @event, object sender, T e)
        where T : EventArgs
    {
        var handler = @event;
        if (handler != null)
            handler(sender, e);
    }
}

With these extension methods in place, all you need to declare and raise an event is something like this:

public event EventHandler SomethingHappened;

void SomeMethod()
{
    this.SomethingHappened.RaiseEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
}

My question: Is this a good idea? Are we missing anything by not having the standard On method? (One thing I notice is that it doesn't work with events that have explicit add/remove code.)

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Maybe you were thinking of this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/192980/… –  Benjol Jun 11 '09 at 10:31
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5 Answers

up vote 36 down vote accepted

It will still work with events that have an explicit add/remove - you just need to use the delegate variable (or however you've stored the delegate) instead of the event name.

However, there's an easier way to make it thread-safe - initialize it with a no-op handler:

public event EventHandler SomethingHappened = delegate {};

The performance hit of calling an extra delegate will be negligible, and it sure makes the code easier.

By the way, in your extension method you don't need an extra local variable - you could just do:

static public void RaiseEvent(this EventHandler @event, object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (@event != null)
        @event(sender, e);
}

static public void RaiseEvent<T>(this EventHandler<T> @event, object sender, T e)
    where T : EventArgs
{
    if (@event != null)
        @event(sender, e);
}

Personally I wouldn't use a keyword as a parameter name, but it doesn't really change the calling side at all, so do what you want :)

EDIT: As for the "OnXXX" method: are you planning on your classes being derived from? In my view, most classes should be sealed. If you do, do you want those derived classes to be able to raise the event? If the answer to either of these questions is "no" then don't bother. If the answer to both is "yes" then do :)

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1  
Good point; @event can't change once you're in the method. I was aware that you can subscribe an empty delegate, but my concern was more about whether it's good or bad to dispense with the On method. –  Kyralessa Oct 23 '08 at 21:15
    
I recognize this suggestion to use delegate{} from your excellent book! This is awesome :) –  Igal Tabachnik Oct 23 '08 at 21:16
    
Just remember if your class sets the delegate to null, you'll still have an error. I really don't understand why so many people have a problem with this. –  Robert Paulson Oct 23 '08 at 21:30
2  
You guys need to add the [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)] attribute to these extension methods or else your attempt to copy the delegate to a temporary variable could be optimized away by the JITter, allowing for a null reference exception. This could occur in both Kyralessa's and Jon Skeet's versions. So just add [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)] and you are fine, and, yes, you would no longer need to explicitly copy to a temporary variable since simply passing in the value via the method's parameter accomplishes this. –  Mike Rosenblum Jun 25 '09 at 17:44
3  
@Mike: No, I don't believe the JITter is allowed to do that. This was raised as an issue a while back, but I've spoken with someone (I can't remember whether it was Joe Duffy or Vance Morrison; someone like that) who said that was completely against the rules of what's allowed by the JITter and the memory model. –  Jon Skeet Feb 24 '10 at 16:05
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[Here's a thought]

Just write the code once in the recommended way and be done with it. Then you won't confuse your colleagues looking over the code thinking you did something wrong?

[I read more posts trying to find ways around writing an event handler than I ever spend writing an event handler.]

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Less code, more readable. Me like.

If you're not interested in performance you can declare your event like this to avoid the null check:

public event EventHandler SomethingHappened = delegate{};
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You're not "ensuring" thread safety by assigning the handler to a local variable. Your method could still be interrupted after the assignment. If for example the class that used to listen for the event gets disposed during the interruption, you're calling a method in a disposed class.

You're saving yourself from a null reference exception, but there are easier ways to do that, as Jon Skeet and cristianlibardo pointed out in their answers.

Another thing is that for non-sealed classes, the OnFoo method should be virtual which I don't think is possible with extension methods.

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I think they meant to say 'avoiding a race condition'. –  Robert Paulson Oct 23 '08 at 21:32
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The funny thing about this IMHO is that, after following Jon Skeet's simplification of your proposal, the extension method looks like this:

static public void RaiseEvent(this EventHandler @event, object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    @event(sender, e);
}

So you're going to replace one line of code, namely

SomethingHappened(this, new EventArgs(...));

by another line of code, namely:

SomethingHappend.RaiseEvent(this, new EventArgs(...));

which adds ".RaiseEvent".Length characters, plus the extension method definition, a using statement and possibly a reference to the assembly containing the extension method.

Am I wrong?

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The point isn't replacing that line of code. The point is not having to have the OnSomethingHappened method. With the extension methods, you're doing what OnSomethingHappened would've done. But in the end I just use code snippets for the various event declarations, and still have the OnSomethingHappened without the pain of typing it out. –  Kyralessa Mar 23 '11 at 19:40
    
@Kyralessa. Quite some time has past since. In the meanwhile I think I got to understand the whole point of this, namely that events generally can't be raised by subclasses, and that your extension method provides that mechanism. Then of course it makes perfect sense :-) –  chiccodoro Mar 24 '11 at 7:05
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