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There is a possible optimization I could apply to one of my methods, if I can determine that another method in the same class is not overridden. It is only a slight optimization, so reflection is out of the question. Should I just make a protected method that returns whether or not the method in question is overridden, such that a subclass can make it return true?

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2  
How about just don't optimize it? It sounds like the optimization isn't significant enough to really matter. –  Anon. Feb 23 '10 at 0:59
    
Anon: The method is called hundreds of times per second. –  PiPeep Feb 23 '10 at 1:08
    
Then go for reflection, and cache the result in a private field. –  Anon. Feb 23 '10 at 1:15
    
Anon: A possibility, just a little unclean. –  PiPeep Feb 23 '10 at 1:34
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8 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I wouldn't do this. It violates encapsulation and changes the contract of what your class is supposed to do without implementers knowing about it.

If you must do it, though, the best way is to invoke

class.getMethod("myMethod").getDeclaringClass();

If the class that's returned is your own, then it's not overridden; if it's something else, that subclass has overridden it. Yes, this is reflection, but it's still pretty cheap.

I do like your protected-method approach, though. That would look something like this:

public class ExpensiveStrategy {
  public void expensiveMethod() {
    // ...
    if (employOptimization()) {
      // take a shortcut
    }
  }

  protected boolean employOptimization() {
    return false;
  }
}

public class TargetedStrategy extends ExpensiveStrategy {
  @Override
  protected boolean employOptimization() {
    return true; // Now we can shortcut ExpensiveStrategy.
  }
}
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Well, my optimization is a small yield on a case-by-case basis, and it only speeds things a lot because it is called hundreds of times per second. With reflection, that yield would be reduced to such a point that the optimization is pointless. A good answer, so I'm upvoting this anyways. –  PiPeep Feb 23 '10 at 1:07
    
If you really really need it you could determine if the method(s) are overloaded via in a static initialiser and store the result in a boolean. Alternatively you could add this via aspectj –  vickirk Feb 23 '10 at 1:11
    
Use Class.getMethod instead. Class.getDeclaredMethod will raise NoSuchMethodException if you ask about an inherited method that the the subclass does not override. Of course, you could use the exception as an (poor) indicator that the method wasn't overriden. –  Noel Ang Feb 23 '10 at 1:14
    
@vickirk: Static caching wouldn't work. The superclass doesn't know (without reflection) what subclass is invoking it, so it can't cache the result. If a different subclass invokes it later, that cached result will be wrong. –  John Feminella Feb 23 '10 at 1:19
    
Noel: Not only is that reflection, but try...catch blocks are slow too. –  PiPeep Feb 23 '10 at 1:46
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Well, my optimization is a small yield on a case-by-case basis, and it only speeds things a lot because it is called hundreds of times per second.

You might want to see just what the Java optimizer can do. Your hand-coded optimization might not be necessary.

If you decide that hand-coded optimization is necessary, the protected method approach you described is not a good idea because it exposes the details of your implementation.

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+1 Seems good advice to me, don't know why it was down voted. –  vickirk Feb 23 '10 at 11:36
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How many times do you expect the function to be called during the lifetime of the program? Reflection for a specific single method should not be too bad. If it is not worth that much time over the lifetime of the program my recommendation is to keep it simple, and don't include the small optimization.

Jacob

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It is a very commonly called method. –  PiPeep Feb 23 '10 at 1:02
2  
Let me clarify my answer. I was suggesting that if you have this common pattern, and the instances are all of the same type, you could cache the value of the reflection that is performed once. You determine the configuration the first time, and use that value throughout. This way, the reflection overhead would be one time and the calls would be a much larger number. If this is called repeatedly on each instance, an instance variable declared in the parent class and lazy initialized on the first call (using reflection) might give you a boost. –  TheJacobTaylor Feb 23 '10 at 4:46
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maybe there is a cleaner way to do this via the Strategy Pattern, though I do not know how the rest of your application and data are modeled but it seem like it might fit.

It did to me anyhow when I was faced with a similar problem. You could have a heuristic that decides which strategy to use depending on the data that is to be processed.

Again, I do not have enough information on your specific usage to see if this is overkill or not. However I would refrain from changing the class signature for such specific optimization. Usually when I feel the urge to go against the current I take it as a sing that I had not forseen a corner case when I designed the thing and that I should refactor it to a cleaner more comprehensive solution.

however beware, such refactoring when done solely on optimization grounds almost inevitably lead to disaster. If this is the case I would take the reflecive approach suggested above. It does not alter the inheritance contract, and when done properly needs be done once only per subclass that requires it for the runtime life of the application.

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I know this is a slightly old question, but for the sake of other googlers:

I came up with a different solution using interfaces.

class FastSub extends Super {}
class SlowSub extends Super implements Super.LetMeHandleThis {
    void doSomethingSlow() {
        //not optimized
    }
}
class Super {
    static interface LetMeHandleThis {
        void doSomethingSlow();
    }
    void doSomething() {
        if (this instanceof LetMeHandleThis)
            ((LetMeHandleThis) this).doSomethingSlow();
        else
            doSomethingFast();
    }
    private final void doSomethingFast() {
        //optimized
    }
}

or the other way around:

class FastSub extends Super implements Super.OptimizeMe {}
class SlowSub extends Super {
    void doSomethingSlow() {
        //not optimized
    }
}
class Super {
    static interface OptimizeMe {}
    void doSomething() {
        if (this instanceof OptimizeMe)
            doSomethingFast();
        else
            doSomethingSlow();
    }
    private final void doSomethingFast() {
        //optimized
    }
    void doSomethingSlow(){}
}
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Reflection can be used to determine if a method is overridden. The code is a little bit tricky. For instance, you need to be aware that you have a runtime class that is a subclass of the class that overrides the method.

You are going to see the same runtime classes over and over again. So you can save the results of the check in a WeakHashMap keyed on the Class.

See my code in java.awt.Component dealing with coalesceEvents for an example.

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no can do, the value changes slightly each time. –  PiPeep Feb 23 '10 at 1:33
    
@PiPeep: The actual instance is irrelevant. As I say, map key based upon the runtime class. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 23 '10 at 1:43
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Annotate subclasses that overrides the particular method. @OverridesMethodX.

Perform the necessary reflective work on class load (i.e., in a static block) so that you publish the information via a final boolean flag. Then, query the flag where and when you need it.

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static blocks break inheritance. –  PiPeep Feb 23 '10 at 1:33
    
I know it smells. But the optimization you want is already subverting polymorphism. –  Noel Ang Feb 23 '10 at 2:51
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private static boolean isMethodImplemented(Object obj, String name)
{
    try
    {
        Class<? extends Object> clazz = obj.getClass();

        return clazz.getMethod(name).getDeclaringClass().equals(clazz);
    }
    catch (SecurityException e)
    {
        log.error("{}", e);
    }
    catch (NoSuchMethodException e)
    {
        log.error("{}", e);
    }

    return false;
}
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You posted exactly same answer here and here. If you can give exactly same answer then you should mark question as duplicated, not duplicate answer too. –  Adriano Oct 28 '13 at 16:36
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