Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Today a co-worker mentioned he had issues with a large "enterprisey frameworky" project that when compiled was 5mb in size. The concern was that to use a even a small piece of functionality of the assembly you had to reference the entire thing and that is bad for some reason.

I'm wondering if there are any performance or other disadvantages from loading such a big assembly in a website deployment hosted on IIS?

share|improve this question
3  
Interesting question. –  Fitzchak Yitzchaki Feb 23 '10 at 1:35
2  
5mb is so small! I found a 2gb stick of RAM under my pillow last night, the tooth fairy is moving up in the world :D –  Alastair Pitts Feb 23 '10 at 1:51
1  
Heh, yeah, I don't even measure things in MB anymore. Its either x gigs or < a gig. ;) –  jfar Feb 23 '10 at 2:17
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The first time a type is used, the assembly will be loaded. Loading 5MB from disk does have a performance cost (although this is not huge). Also, the assembly will stay in memory for the life of the AppDomain, so there's a bit of memory cost (again, not huge).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Don't optimise using anecdotal evidence. Get some hard numbers and then determine whether the problem exists for you.

Generally I'd say that its not a problem for me anywhere - but I don't download these assemblies on demand via HTTP over unreliable links, on a server with low memory - your use case may be different.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The major disadvantage is resource consumption; that .DLL stays in memory as long as the program is executing. 5MB isn't actually all that bad, though... System.dll alone, for example, is 3MB.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.