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Excuse my lack of knowledge in secure coding. I have a piece of sensitive code that I want to protect. I am using obfuscation, I am using C/C++ instead of Objective-C on sensitive code, cryptography, etc., but I am not seeing how I can make hard a piece of code like this:

if (!passwordIsOK()) {
  return;
}

This can be easily bypassed with NOPs.

How do I secure a code that is typically an if test or similar in Objective-C?

I know the question can lead to a broad range of answers but this is the objective, that is, to know different techniques.

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by rmaddy, danielbeard, zaph, Kreiri, Monolo Apr 19 '14 at 7:03

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
BTW - By now you should understand what tags are for. Please try to use relevant tags in your questions. – rmaddy Apr 18 '14 at 17:27
    
If this is a server application, couldn't you just do all of the user verification on the server side? It would be a lot easier to secure. – John Apr 18 '14 at 17:28
1  
This seems like it's more about security than it is about coding per se. I'd suggest asking on security.stackexchange.com, because the people there are rather more likely to know whether something is secure than people here are. (If you think you're alone in not being good with security, rest assured you are in good company with about 95% of programmers.) – Chuck Apr 18 '14 at 20:45
1  
@RubberDuck You are concerned about jailbreaking? Otherwise the app is signed, sandboxed and in a execute only segment. – zaph Apr 18 '14 at 21:24
1  
I'm with @Chuck I think this is a good and valid question, but I don't think it belongs on StackOverflow. – joce Apr 21 '14 at 2:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

One really convoluted way of doing it, but that would work, is by returning an Objective-C object in your isPasswordOK() function then calling a method to continue execution from that object; if the function returns nil (or NULL) nothing happens, if the function returns an object, execution continues.

One way of implementing this is by using, for example, NSInvocation. Let's say your isPasswordOK() method is implemented something like this:

id isPasswordOK(id target)
{
     // do stuff here //
     if (passwordOK) // hehehe
     {
         NSMethodSignature * signature = [NSMutableArray instanceMethodSignatureForSelector:@selector(postAuthentication)];
         NSInvocation * ret = [NSInvocation invocationWithMethodSignature:signature];
         [ret setTarget:target];
         [ret setSelector:@selector(postAuthentication)];
         return ret;
     }
     return NULL;
}

Then your Objective-C object would be something like this:

@implementation AuthenticationHandler

-(void) authenticate
{
    // setup the authentication here //
    NSInvocation *result = isPasswordOK(self);
    [result invoke];
}

-(void) postAuthentication
{
    NSLog("Password is OK, authentication successful!");
    // put here the code that would have been after the if statement in your example //
}
@end

You could then extend your isPasswordOK() function to take a selector as well to make it more flexible, like id isPasswordOK(id target, SEL selector)

I hope this helps. WARNING: All code was written in browser.

Edit:
As Chuck pointed out in the comments, if you don't have a way to make the if statement within the isPasswordOK() function secure, then this code is not secure. Here's another solution for the same problem, assuming that the return value of isPasswordOK() is secure. I like this solution even less but will get the job done:

@implementation AuthenticationHandler
{
    id targetList[2];
}

-(instancetype) init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self)
    {
        targetList[0] = nil;
        targetList[1] = self;
    }
    return self;
}

-(void) authenticate
{
    // setup the authentication here //
    // the code below can be written in one line, it is expanded for learning purposes //
    BOOL result = isPasswordOK();
    id target = targetList[(int)!!result];
    [target postAuthentication];
    // one line version:
    // [targetList[(int)!!isPasswordOK()] postAuthentication];
}

-(void) postAuthentication
{
    NSLog("Password is OK, authentication successful!");
    // put here the code that would have been after the if statement in your example //
}
@end

To obfuscate this even more, instead of using nil at index 0, you could create a "sentinel" object that inherits from NSProxy and does nothing when methods are called from it, also offsetting the array to have the correct object at say index 3 etc. All these ideas do, though, is make reverse engineering harder but not impossible.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks!!!!!!!!!!! – SpaceDog Apr 18 '14 at 20:36
2  
It seems like this just pushes the problem down a level. If an attacker is capable of overwriting returns with nops, why wouldn't he be capable of overwriting your if (passwordOK)? – Chuck Apr 18 '14 at 20:43
    
@Chuck that's why I added the hehehe comment in the code, I assume he already has a way to obfuscate logic calls in his C code, if he doesn't, then the code was broken before he asked the question. – Dario Apr 18 '14 at 20:47
    
It seems pretty certain that the code was broken before he asked the question. The entire point of the question was how to make it secure. – Chuck Apr 18 '14 at 20:48
1  
Once again, if you're trying for "security by obscurity" then you shouldn't be naming methods "isPasswordOk", "authenticate", etc. – Hot Licks Apr 18 '14 at 22:17

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