Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Stack Overflow is my Q&A bible, so first, a massive thanks to all of you contributes out there. You all make my life easier as a developer and save me so much time.

I want to preface my question by saying that I am still pretty new to Python in general, and I come from a background of Java programming predominantly. There is likely a lot of problems in my code as I am still learning the quirks of Python. Be gentle please!

I'm creating an events management application using Django, and I've run into some sort of referencing problem. In the view below, a list of events is created per day of a given week from the day that the view is accessed in the application. I am creating a pre-formatted HTML line of a table to then be displayed in the corresponding template, and adding this to each 'day' object within the list. This seems archaic, I know; why wouldn't I use JS to do this in my view? Reasoning is that I am trying to stay away from depending on JS for the app to function correctly.

The code references the first and last objects(events) in a sorted list, to determine both the starting time of the earliest event and the finishing time of the latest event, which determines how many blank TDs are placed before and after each event, and also the colspan(duration) of the event. in half hour resolution. However, depending on the current iteration of the for loop in my template, these references are changing, for some reason that I cannot understand. I've spent hours trying to grok this, and have tried many different solutions to no avail.

Additionally, I have noticed that the length of my events list seems to be being reduced by one for every iteration, as if a 'pop' function is automatically taking place... I don't get this!

All imports are correct and included at the top of views.py. I didn't see it as necessary to include them.

The function:

def getWeekView(currDay): #currDay is simply datetime.now()
    week_view = []
    events = []
    daily = list(Event.objects.filter(how_often='daily')) #copy querysets to lists to ease DB queries
    weekly = list(Event.objects.filter(how_often='weekly'))

    for day in xrange(0, 7, 1):
        searchRange = [datetime(currDay.year, currDay.month, currDay.day, 0, 0, 0), datetime(currDay.year, currDay.month, currDay.day, 23, 59, 59)]
        events = list(Event.objects.filter(date__range=searchRange, is_repeat=False))
        for event in daily: #copy recurring events into events list
            if is_open(event.business, currDay.isoweekday()):
                events.append(event)
        for event in weekly:
            if (event.date).isoweekday() == currDay.isoweekday() and is_open(event.business, currDay.isoweekday()):
                events.append(event)
        events = sorted(events, key=lambda event: (event.date).time())
        if len(events) > 0:
            earliest_time = (events[0].date).time()
            latest_time = (events[len(events)-1].end).time()
            earliest = Decimal(earliest_time.hour) + (Decimal(earliest_time.minute)/60)
            latest = Decimal(latest_time.hour) + (Decimal(latest_time.minute)/60)
            blocks = []
            x = earliest
            while x <= latest:
                if x % 1 != 0:
                    blocks.append("%s:%s" % (str(int(floor(x))), '30'))
                else:
                    blocks.append("%s:%s" % (str(int(x)), '00'))
                x = x+Decimal(0.5)
            for event in events:
                end_time = (event.end).time()
                start_time = (event.date).time()
                end = Decimal(end_time.hour) + (Decimal(end_time.minute)/60)
                start = Decimal(start_time.hour) + (Decimal(start_time.minute)/60)
                duration = (end - start)*2 #multiply by two for 1/2hr resolution in the resultant table 
                temp = "<tr>"
                x = earliest
                while x < start:
                    temp = "%s%s" % (temp, "<td>&nbsp;</td>")
                    x = x+Decimal(0.5)
                if duration > 1:
                    # I changed this to output variables for the purposes of debugging the issue. Normally the commented line underneath this would apply.
                    temp += """<td colspan="%s">earliest_time:%s latest_time:%s earliest:%s latest:%s start:%s end:%s duration:%s x:%s len of events:%s</td>""" % (int(duration), earliest_time, latest_time, earliest, latest, start, end, duration, x, len(events))
                    #temp += """<td colspan="%s"><a href="%s">%s</a></td>""" % (int(duration), reverse('event_detail', args=[event.pk]),event.title)
                else:
                     temp += """<td><a href="%s">%s</a></td>""" % (reverse('event_detail', args=[event.pk]),event.title)
                x += duration
                while x < latest:
                    temp += '<td>&nbsp;</td>'
                    x += Decimal(0.5)
                temp += '</tr>'
                event.row = temp
            week_view.append({'day':currDay.strftime('%a, %x'), 'events':events, 'blocks':blocks})
        else:
            week_view.append({'day':currDay.strftime('%a, %x')})
        currDay += timedelta(days=1)

    return week_view

Sample textual Output:

    Fri, 04/18/14   
    3:00    3:30    4:00    4:30    5:00    5:30    6:00    6:30    7:00    7:30
    earliest_time:03:00:00 latest_time:07:30:00 earliest:3 latest:7.5 start:3 end:5.5 duration:5.0 x:3 len of events:2
    earliest_time:05:30:00 latest_time:07:30:00 earliest:5.5 latest:7.5 start:5.5 end:7.5 duration:4.0 x:5.5 len of events:1
    Sat, 04/19/14   
    5:30    6:00    6:30    7:00    7:30
    earliest_time:05:30:00 latest_time:07:30:00 earliest:5.5 latest:7.5 start:5.5 end:7.5 duration:4.0 x:5.5 len of events:1
    Sun, 04/20/14
    No Events Listed
    Mon, 04/21/14   
    5:30    6:00    6:30    7:00    7:30
    earliest_time:05:30:00 latest_time:07:30:00 earliest:5.5 latest:7.5 start:5.5 end:7.5 duration:4.0 x:5.5 len of events:1
    Tue, 04/22/14   
    5:30    6:00    6:30    7:00    7:30
    earliest_time:05:30:00 latest_time:07:30:00 earliest:5.5 latest:7.5 start:5.5 end:7.5 duration:4.0 x:5.5 len of events:1
    Wed, 04/23/14   
    5:30    6:00    6:30    7:00    7:30
    earliest_time:05:30:00 latest_time:07:30:00 earliest:5.5 latest:7.5 start:5.5 end:7.5 duration:4.0 x:5.5 len of events:1
    Thu, 04/24/14   
    5:30    6:00    6:30    7:00    7:30
    earliest_time:05:30:00 latest_time:07:30:00 earliest:5.5 latest:7.5 start:5.5 end:7.5 duration:4.0 x:5.5 len of events:1

The related Django model:

class Event(models.Model):
    DAILY = 'daily'
    WEEKLY = 'weekly'
    REPEAT_CHOICES = (
        (DAILY, 'Daily'),
        (WEEKLY, 'Weekly'),
    )
    title = models.CharField(max_length=25, help_text="Please enter the name of your event")
    description = models.CharField(max_length=255, help_text="Please enter a description of your event")
    date = models.DateTimeField(help_text="Please select the date and start time of your event")
    end = models.DateTimeField(help_text="Please select the end time / date that your event will finish")
    business = models.ForeignKey(Business)
    category = models.ManyToManyField(Category, help_text="Please select the category(ies) of your event")
    is_repeat = models.BooleanField(default=False, help_text="Please select whether your event will repeat")
    how_often = models.CharField(max_length=7, blank=True, choices=REPEAT_CHOICES, help_text="Please select how often your event will repeat")

    def __unicode__(self):
        return unicode(self.title)

Code from the template responsible for iterating through the week object and outputting to browser:

<div>
    <table id="index-table">
        <tr><th>Date</th><th>Events</th></tr>
        {% for day in week_obj %}
            <tr><td>{{ day.day }}</td>
                <td>{% if day.events %}<table id="events-table{{ forloop.counter }}" class="table"><tbody><tr>{% for block in day.blocks %}<th>{{ block }}</th>{% endfor %}{% for event in day.events %}{{ event.row|safe }}{% endfor %}</tbody></table>{% else %}No Events Listed{% endif %}</td>
            </tr>
        {% endfor %}
    </table>
</div>

I really appreciate any help anybody out there can offer on this. I am most perplexed, and I want to understand why Python behaves like this (or what the hell I am doing to cause it to do so!)

Additionally, I am always open to suggestions on how I can make my code better. Be as critical as you like, I need to learn.

Many thanks!

share|improve this question
    
An object will only be removed from a list if/when .. code removes it. I suspect the problem (although I'm not going to read that code :) is that the code is mutating the same list object unexpectedly. Remember that an assignment (or using an object as an argument) does not create a copy/clone/duplicate the object. –  user2864740 Apr 18 at 19:12
1  
My comment is off topic, but I am just curious (sorry!): in what sense coping quesryset to a list would "ease DB queries"? You realise that it would make one database query anyway? All you do is just loading everything into memory and throwing away optimisations in Django ORM. –  Ludwik Trammer Apr 18 at 19:19
1  
Some observations on the code. 1) You aren't using the day loop variable. Typically _ is used to show when it isn't needed. 2) You don't need to use len() to find the end of a sequence just use events[-1]. 3) The creation of the empty <td> elements is a bit awkward. You could simplify it as temp = temp + '<td>&nbsp;</td>' * int((start - earliest) * 2) and similarly for the end. This would eliminate the clutter of updating x in the last section. –  Kevin Thibedeau Apr 18 at 19:44
    
Thanks for the sanity check, user2864740. @ludwik, if a queryset is constantly manipulated, from my research and also from using Django Toolbar to check my findings, more queries seem to hit my DB. Its old, but I read that [here](here: multitasked.net/2010/jan/19/django-orm-tricks). There are almost certainly better methods of optimisation, but for the time being, it seems to help. –  Karl Fischmann Apr 18 at 20:34
    
@KarlFischmann Yeah, it happens to me sometime that Django generates more SQL queries than I would expect. But I was always able to fix those issues easily, without reverting to such dirty tricks. I don't think they are a good idea. Also, it doesn't happen often anymore, because fixing the issues I learned not to do. –  Ludwik Trammer Apr 19 at 7:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Others with actual Django experience can help with the general questions. In any case, with respect to your immediate issue:

    for day in xrange(0, 7, 1):
        searchRange = [datetime(currDay.year, currDay.month, currDay.day, 0, 0, 0), datetime(currDay.year, currDay.month, currDay.day, 23, 59, 59)]
        events = list(Event.objects.filter(date__range=searchRange, is_repeat=False))
        # etc.
        currDay += timedelta(days=1)

At the beginning of each iteration, you redefine events using a filter defined with a range starting one day ahead (given the update to currDay at the end of the iteration). Therefore, events[0] changes and events gets one element shorter each iteration.

share|improve this answer
1  
Are there more questions, really? I read Karl's post couple of times to find them and I think he just made a poor job isolating the issue. PS: Please, keep in mind Karl that I don't say this just to annoy you. I think proper debugging and isolation of problems is an essential skill for every programmer. Have you done it before asking the question you would have a short, lean code showing just the problem. –  Ludwik Trammer Apr 18 at 19:32
    
You can read more about this in an article entitled "How to be a Programmer: A Short, Comprehensive, and Personal Summary" in a chapter called "How to Debug by Splitting the Problem Space" here: samizdat.mines.edu/howto/HowToBeAProgrammer.html –  Ludwik Trammer Apr 18 at 19:32
    
Thanks for your input @LudwikTrammer. I do agree that my initial post failed to clearly identify my issue. I agree that proper bug isolation is an important part of any programmers education. I've not been actively developing for some time, so it would seem that my skills in that area need improvement. Thanks for the link. –  Karl Fischmann Apr 18 at 20:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.