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I have a piece of code that I want to optimize for readability and performance and coolness. Right now I have this ugly looking thing:

if      ( cond1 &&  cond2 &&  cond3 && !cond4)
{
     // do something 
}
else if ( cond1 &&  cond2 && !cond3 &&  cond4)
{
    // do something 
}
else if ( cond1 && !cond2 &&  cond3 &&  cond4)
{
   // do something 
}
else if (!cond1 &&  cond2 &&  cond3 &&  cond4)
{
    // do something 
}
else
{
    // do something 
}

where cond1, cond2, cond3 and cond4 are booleans that have been initialized prior to the block of code above. I want to make this faster, less ugly and more cool.

I'm thinking about doing this:

int val = (cond1 ? 0 : 1) + 2 * (cond2 ? 0 : 1) + 4 * (cond3 ? 0 : 1) + 8 * (cond4 ? 0 : 1);
if (val == 8)
{
    // do something
}
else if (val == 4)
{
    // do something 
}
else if (val == 2)
{
    // do something
}
else if (val == 1)
{
    // do something
}
else
{
    // do something 
}

Does that work or are there flaws? Is there a better way? What is the typical way of achieving the desired result when looking through different combinations of multiple conditions?

share|improve this question
    
Are the bodies of those branches completely different or is there a pattern? –  Niklas B. Apr 18 '14 at 21:09
    
Different. The "do something" is a different something for each condition. –  user3537336 Apr 18 '14 at 21:16
    
The only issue I see is that creating the integer might be error prone. If using java or any other language that allows varargs you could make it a separate method to test in isolation. –  Giovanni Botta Apr 18 '14 at 21:19
6  
The most significant difference between your existing code and your proposed revision is loss of readability. The first sample has a obvious parallel structure which is completely obscured by your transformation from booleans to arbitrary sums. I'd reject sample two in a code review. –  msw Apr 19 '14 at 6:09
    
Is this code C or C++? The difference affects how it could be re-factored. –  Vality Apr 19 '14 at 13:12

10 Answers 10

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Well, the most pleasant way to write that would probably be

if(cond1 + cond2 + cond3 + cond4 == 3)
{
    if(!cond1)
    {
        // do something
    }
    else if(!cond2)
    {
        // do something
    }
    else if(!cond3)
    {
        // do something
    }
    else // !cond4
    {
        // do something
    }
}
else
{
    // do something
}

I'm wary of those values not being in an array, though.

share|improve this answer
2  
That (implicit conversion from boolean to integer) will only work in C or C++ as far as I know - the question didn't indicate the language, but it could very well be Java or C# (especially considering the (cond1 ? 0 : 1)). –  Dukeling Apr 18 '14 at 21:25
    
good to say that in the first part everything evaluates to 3 because every boolean values can be 0 or 1, so supposing that the 1st, 2nd and 3rd conditions are true(1) and the last is false(0) the sum is 3 :) –  blade Apr 18 '14 at 21:26
    
I thought of doing that, but isn't it redundant? If the outer if statement evaluates as true, you're guaranteed to retest one of the 4 conditions. I thought that retesting of conditions was a no-no. –  user3537336 Apr 18 '14 at 21:27
2  
@user3537336 From a performance standpoint, the fact that you've got four separate booleans in the first place is of much greater concern. From a stylistic standpoint, avoiding retesting conditions is a fairly good rule of thumb, but should be ignored from time to time. –  Sneftel Apr 18 '14 at 21:30
1  
@user3537336 If those are non-trivial function calls, it's probably not a good idea to recheck them (but the result can be stored in local variables), but if they're just variables you absolutely should not worry about the performance of testing one of them twice unless you have significant reason to believe that it would affect performance (through benchmarking). The time taken to check a simple variable is negligible in 99+% of applications. –  Dukeling Apr 18 '14 at 21:35

One way or another you want to get your values into bit flags. That is you want a bit set or not in an integer type for every condition. Then every 4-bit value in your case represents one of your above ANDed conditions. After that, you can use a switch statement. It's arguably more readable, and the compiler can often optimize it into a jump table. That is, it will just offset your program counter by some value in a lookup table or something of the sort, and you no longer need to check every combination of values. In this way your checking for ANDed cases becomes constant time rather than linear, that is if you added 4 more flags and there were now 256 combinations rather than 16 than this method would be just as fast in a big-oh way. Alternatively, if you don't trust the compiler to make the switch statement a jump table you can do it yourself using the flags value as an index to an array of function pointers. It's also probably worth noting that the ORed enum case values are folded or pre-computed at compile-time.

  enum {
    C1 = 0x1,
    C2 = 0x2,
    C3 = 0x4,
    C4 = 0x8
  };

  unsigned flags = 0;
  flags |= cond1 ? C1 : 0x0;
  flags |= cond2 ? C2 : 0x0;
  flags |= cond3 ? C3 : 0x0;
  flags |= cond4 ? C4 : 0x0;

  switch (flags) {
    case 0: // !cond1 && !cond2 && !cond3 && !cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1: //  cond1 && !cond2 && !cond3 && !cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C2: // !cond1 &&  cond2 && !cond3 && !cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1 | C2: //  cond1 &&  cond2 && !cond3 && !cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C3: // !cond1 && !cond2 &&  cond3 && !cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1 | C3: //  cond1 && !cond2 &&  cond3 && !cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C2 | C3: // !cond1 &&  cond2 &&  cond3 && !cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1 | C2 | C3: //  cond1 &&  cond2 &&  cond3 && !cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C4: // !cond1 && !cond2 && !cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1 | C4: //  cond1 && !cond2 && !cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C2 | C4: // !cond1 &&  cond2 && !cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1 | C2 | C4: //  cond1 &&  cond2 && !cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C3 | C4: // !cond1 && !cond2 &&  cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1 | C3 | C4: //  cond1 && !cond2 &&  cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C2 | C3 | C4: // !cond1 &&  cond2 &&  cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1 | C2 | C3 | C4: //  cond1 &&  cond2 &&  cond3 &&  cond4
      ; // do something
  };

Also, this covers all the combinations. If you just need some subset feel free to remove some of the cases. The compiler is very good at optimizing switch statements. It's probably faster than any clever special-case arithmetic trick you could roll yourself.

  enum {
    C1 = 0x1,
    C2 = 0x2,
    C3 = 0x4,
    C4 = 0x8
  };

  unsigned flags = 0;
  flags |= cond1 ? C1 : 0x0;
  flags |= cond2 ? C2 : 0x0;
  flags |= cond3 ? C3 : 0x0;
  flags |= cond4 ? C4 : 0x0;

  switch (flags) {
    case C1 | C2 | C3: //  cond1 &&  cond2 &&  cond3 && !cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1 | C2 | C4: //  cond1 &&  cond2 && !cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C1 | C3 | C4: //  cond1 && !cond2 &&  cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    case C2 | C3 | C4: // !cond1 &&  cond2 &&  cond3 &&  cond4
      // do something
      break;
    default:
      // do something
      ;
  };
share|improve this answer
    
You know I should really be using enums for the flags and case statements. I'll edit it later when I'm back in front of a desktop. –  Apriori Apr 19 '14 at 1:56

From my experience - having a series of long if/else statements indicates a similar yet distinguishable behavior.

I usually try to introduce an interface and implementing classes that catch this behavior, and invoke a method that will produce the desired outcome.

This makes the code much more readable - no need to go over a complex flow (that might get nested later on). Each class is responsible for the implementation of the abstract method, and the object manipulated will have static type of the interface, and its dynamic type - the most matching implementing class.

share|improve this answer
    
u meant the Strategy pattern perhaps? –  Songo Apr 19 '14 at 17:04

put on the left the condition that has the most chance to be false, doing that it continues to the other if without checking the remaining conditions, so you gain in performance, in what is known as short-circuit

share|improve this answer

Requirement for both readable and well-performing code may be contradictory and does not have an easy one-size-fits-all solution. My recommendation is to clearly prioritize the goals you want to achieve by the refactoring. What is the primary "Why" why you're optimizing the code

optimize for readability

use declarative table driven aproach to declare branches their conditions and other artifacts (what they do). Use a code generator to create ugly code from that. Tables are usually easy to read (BTW the "ugly looking thing" you want to optimize is easy to read once you read it as a table with columns [cond1,cond2,cond3,cond4,action])

or don't bother. Most of today's code ($->_::.:==> etc.) can not be read without colorizers or go-to-definition tools and other code reading enhancers anyway. e.g. Code Rocket can display automatic easy to read flow diagrams right inside your IDE

optimize for performance

exact effective optimization technique depends on the compiler and the target. What's effective may be found out for sure only by analyzing generated low-level machine code. e.g. how friendly it is to the hardware pipeline. This may be different for CISC or RICS architectures. In your case of combination of conditions especially branch prediction is important. Many times direct jump tables may be more efficient. Both real and abstract processors usually have special optimized instructions for this case. On the other hand slightly different copy/pasted code may perform better but will be less maintainable

optimize for coolness

don't know. My lately learned definition for cool code is:

  • correct (no bugs)
  • portable (easily reusable in other projects preferably as black box. copy/paste friendly is plus)
  • documented (what it does and why - explained at least in the embedded comments)

the typical way to simplify/optimize combinations of conditions

  • current hardware guys solve this puzzle frequently on the level of VHDL code. They have some circuit output signal simulators to help
  • old hardware guys solved circuit minimization as well, e.g. Karnaugh's maps were in the books long before I was born
  • software testers solve this problem when looking for combination of tests with sufficient code coverage. One technique is the decision tables
share|improve this answer

If you can use c++11, you can possibly rewrite it based on my work for this earlier answer: How to simplify multiple if-else-if statements in c++:

switch(combine(cond1, cond2, cond3, cond4))
{
    case combine(1,1,1,0): do_something(1); break;
    case combine(1,1,0,1): do_something(2); break;
    case combine(1,0,1,1): do_something(3); break;
    case combine(0,1,1,1): do_something(4); break;
    default: 
        do_something_else();
        break;
}

The beauty of it is that combine is fully compile-time evaluated - leveraging the powers of constexpr.

It is variadic too (so it supports up to the number of bits in int_max_t on your compiler configuration).

Full Example: Live On Coliru. The mechanics (which you can put into some header, e.g. logic_combine.hpp):

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <limits>
#include <cstdint>

namespace detail
{
        // a little overkill to have a functor here too, but it's a good habit™
    template <typename T = uintmax_t>
    struct to_bitmask_f
    {
        template <typename... Flags> struct result { typedef T type; };

        template <typename... Flags>
            typename result<Flags...>::type
            constexpr operator()(Flags... flags) const {
                static_assert(sizeof...(Flags) < std::numeric_limits<uintmax_t>::digits, "Too many flags for integral representation)");
                return impl(flags...);
            }

    private:
        constexpr static inline T impl() { return {}; }
        template <typename... Flags>
            constexpr static inline T impl(bool b, Flags... more) { 
            return (b?1:0) + (impl(more...) << (T(1)));
        }
    };
}

template <typename T = uintmax_t, typename... Flags>
    constexpr T combine(Flags... flags)
{
    return detail::to_bitmask_f<T>()(flags...);
}

The demonstration:

void do_something(int i) { std::cout << "something " << i << "\n"; }
void do_something_else() { std::cout << "something else\n"; }

void f(bool cond1, bool cond2, bool cond3, bool cond4) {
    switch(combine(cond1, cond2, cond3, cond4))
    {
        case combine(1,1,1,0): do_something(1); break;
        case combine(1,1,0,1): do_something(2); break;
        case combine(1,0,1,1): do_something(3); break;
        case combine(0,1,1,1): do_something(4); break;
        default: 
            do_something_else();
            break;
    }
}

int main()
{
    // some test-cases
    f(1,0,1,0);
    f(1,0,0,1);
    f(0,1,1,0);
    f(0,1,0,1);
    f(0,1,1,1);
    f(1,1,1,1);
    f(1,1,1,0);
    f(0,0,0,0);
}

Prints

something else
something else
something else
something else
something 4
something else
something 1
something else
share|improve this answer

Your proposed modification works. You get a power of two precisely when all but one of the conditions are true, and the power of two you get is determined by which condition is false. In general you could handle any short list of true/false combinations this way, by simply using the binary representations of the combinations that you wish to use as cases that you test for. For readability you may want to write the combination numbers in your if statements in binary instead of decimal, so you can easily tell which combinations of true/false you are checking for.

share|improve this answer

This is just begging for some kind of lookup table and function pointers/delegates. The pattern If/elseif/elseif/elseif should be avoided, it's hard to read, it's hard to understand.

Replace int val=.... and the big fake switch statement with enumb action = getAction(); actions(action)();. It's easy, it's simple, and if things go wrong it lets you immediately focus on what the problem is: either the action is coded incorrectly, or you picked the wrong action. Both possibilities are easy to investigate, and will be straightforward to work on.

Of course, depending upon your language and your conditions, you might want to do this with an interface or subtyping (polymorphism), which will naturally look different, but basically it boilps down to the same thing:

share|improve this answer

You don't say anything about the complexity of your conditions. That would be a key deciding factor for me.

I'll ignore the 'faster' for now. I'll get back to that later.

Consider Servant Pattern or Strategy Pattern if:

  1. your if-elseif pattern holds up for all conditions
  2. 'state' being used in the conditions is small, or can be refactored into a 'state object/struct', which makes it easier to pass into a function
  3. the list of conditions is much longer and/or complex than you include here

code:

class CondState {
  int x;
  int y;

  // I'd use bool? or Lazy<bool> in C# but if you don't have
  // those constructs use a simple tri-state enum.
  // Unknown = 0 is not yet evaluated
  // True    = 1
  // False   = 2
  TriState cond1Cache = 0;
  TriState cond2 = 0;
  TriState cond3 = 0;
}

function Rule1(ref CondState state) : bool // returns true when done
{
  if (... first complex condition) {
    ... do complex action
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}

function Rule2(ref CondState state) : bool
function Rule3(ref CondState state) : bool
...
function Rule40(ref CondState state) : bool // returns true when done


// --- in your original function
// build state object
var state = {} 

// build the list of rules: a list of function pointers (C) 
// or function objects (js/node/python)
var rules = [Rule1, Rule2, Rule3 ..., Rule40]

foreach (r in rules) {
  if (rule(state))
    break;
}

This is much cleaner code to 'execute' the rules. It makes it simple and cleaner to:

  1. lazy-evaluate conditions
  2. cache conditions
  3. have different lists of rules (rare, but powerful)

Finally, let me get back to performance. If performance is important this only makes sense if part of the conditional logic overwhelms the lower-level performance concerns. Of course this adds OO overhead and you have to allocate the list (to hold the function refs). But this is a step toward larger OO patterns: Strategy Pattern or Visitor Pattern, which I see as the 'cool' solution to this problem once you get beyond trivial samples (say more than 10 complex conditions).

share|improve this answer

I am suspicious of the four 'independent' looking booleans, which cover 16 cases of which only 4 seem to be expected, plus a default case. Can any combination really be covered? Are several of these set in the same place or dependent on each other? If the default case is hit, what case(s) will usually be expected?

Just the fact that you are usually looking for one false value out of four rather than one true value suggests that four booleans might not be the right data structure.

Should you be using an enum which has five or so values, eg notCond1, notCond2, notCond3, notCond4 and notAny? If you do some special behavior when either cond1 or cond2 are false but not when both are, should you change the code that sets each one of them, to make sure that not both are false, and either raise an error or change the other one, according to what is acceptable? Unless you really have constraints on the size of the code, I think it's worth adding some verbosity to make sure that data states which should never happen, can never happen. This improves both readability and error handling.

Does the code above run in a loop or nested loops, and if so, does every bool have the chance to change each time the loop is run, or can you move some of the checks outside of the inner loop?

Could it be that the separate code you call for each combination actually have something in common which can be factored out. You could be aiming for refactoring in several steps something like this (using only two bools for simplicity):

if (cond1 && !cond2) {
    SomethingGeneral();
    Cond1Specific();
}
if (cond2 && !cond1) {
    SomethingGeneral();
    Cond2Specific();
}

to

if (cond1 != cond2) {
    SomethingGeneral();
}
if (cond1) {
    Cond1Specific();
}
if (cond2) {
    Cond2Specific();
}

to

if (MoreThanOneModeSet()) {
    break; // or throw?
}
SomethingGeneral();
if (mode == Mode1) {
    Cond1Specific();
}
if (mode == Mode2) {
    Cond2Specific();
}

Most of the suggestions above should probably end up leading you towards @amit's very important and correct solution. If you really, really don't see any of them as valid, you should probably opt for @Apriori's neat and complete way of switching between all possible combinations.

If the length of your code and your right to share it allow, you should also try posting a more complete snippet on codereview.stackexchange.com, the suggestions you get there will have a slightly different focus and hopefully be complementary to the help on SO.

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