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I have a .tmLanguage file that's including and thus extending a third-party language definition. Among other things, the third-party file handles single line comments which are defined by a leading ; (or #) symbol:

<dict>
  <key>captures</key>
  <dict>
    <key>1</key>
    <dict>
      <key>name</key>
      <string>punctuation.definition.comment.nsis</string>
    </dict>
  </dict>
  <key>match</key>
  <string>(;|#).*$\n?</string>
  <key>name</key>
  <string>comment.line.nsis</string>
</dict>

Since my own language definition extends the syntax to expressions that need to be ended with semicolons –something that does not apply to the original language– all trailing semicolons will be rendered as if they were part of a comment.

How can I change this behaviour while maintaining the comment-style of the original language file?

share|improve this question
    
What happens if you have a semicolon in the middle of a string? Wouldn't it think that's a comment, too? Is the third-party .tmLanguage available publicly? It seems like the best solution would be to change the original to indicate that the leading capture should only be at the soft beginning of a line (ie, tabs/whitespace allowed) –  MattDMo Apr 19 at 14:06
    
You are right, the problem with the language extension is that it breaks the conventions of the vanilla language. So, it's probably not possible to make a difference between Command ;Comment and the syntax of the the extension Command();. I will contact the author of the language extension and see if he can be pursuaded to change this. –  idleberg Apr 19 at 15:14
    
Another option would be to take the old language definition and just rewrite it for your purposes, so instead of trying to extend it and deal with bugs you can change all the definitions to your liking. –  MattDMo Apr 19 at 16:39

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