Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am a newbie in Python. I want to write a regular expression for some name checking. My input string can contain a-z, A-Z, 0-9, and ' _ ', but it should start with either a-z or A-Z (not 0-9 and ' _ '). I want to write a regular expression for this. I tried, but nothing was matching perfectly.

Once the input string follows the regular expression rules, I can proceed further, otherwise discard that string.

share|improve this question
    
Is the empty string to be allowed? –  Svante Feb 23 '10 at 10:11
1  
Which is it now, - or _? –  Svante Feb 23 '10 at 10:14
    
empty string cannot be allowed. "_" this is hypen not dash –  user279315 Feb 23 '10 at 10:21
2  
"_" is underscore, not hyphen. –  YOU Feb 23 '10 at 10:24

3 Answers 3

>>> import re

>>> re.match("[a-zA-Z][\w-]*$","A")
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x00932E20>

>>> re.match("[a-zA-Z][\w-]*$","A_B")
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x008CA950>

>>> re.match("[a-zA-Z][\w-]*$","0A")
>>> 
>>> re.match("[a-zA-Z][\w-]*$","!A_B")
>>>

Note: OP mentioned string cannot start from ( 0-9 and "_")., apparently _ can be in the text. Thats why I am using \w

Note2: If you don't want match string ends with \n, you could use \Z instead of $ as John Machin mentioned.

share|improve this answer
    
[a-zA-Z][\w-]*$ This regex is wrong as it will match a string that starts with anything. Almost there though, just needs a circumflex at the beginning. –  Mikuso Feb 23 '10 at 10:05
2  
@Mikuso, re.match() only matches from the start of the string. re.search() would need the caret –  John La Rooy Feb 23 '10 at 10:29
    
Wrong; it matches "A\n" –  John Machin Feb 23 '10 at 12:57
    
IF? If you do consciously want to match a "name" that ends with "\n", seek help. –  John Machin Feb 23 '10 at 14:53

Here's an answer to your question:

Interpreting that you want _ (not -), this should do the job:

>>> tests = ["a", "A", "a1", "a_1", "1a", "_a", "a\n", "", "z_"]
>>> for test in tests:
...    print repr(test), bool(re.match(r"[A-Za-z]\w*\Z", test))
...
'a' True
'A' True
'a1' True
'a_1' True
'1a' False
'_a' False
'a\n' False
'' False
'z_' True
>>>

Stoutly resist the temptation to use $; here's why:

Hello, hello, using $ is WRONG, use \Z instead

>>> re.match(r"[a-zA-Z][\w-]*$","A")
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x00BAFE90>
>>> re.match(r"[a-zA-Z][\w-]*$","A\n")
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x00BAFF70> # WRONG; SHOULDN'T MATCH
>>>

>>> re.match(r"[a-zA-Z][\w-]*\Z","A")
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x00BAFE90>
>>> re.match(r"[a-zA-Z][\w-]*\Z","A\n")
>>> # CORRECT: NO MATCH

The Fine Manual says:

'$'
Matches the end of the string or just before the newline at the end of the string [my emphasis], and in MULTILINE mode also matches before a newline. foo matches both ‘foo’ and ‘foobar’, while the regular expression foo$ matches only ‘foo’. More interestingly, searching for foo.$ in 'foo1\nfoo2\n' matches ‘foo2’ normally, but ‘foo1’ in MULTILINE mode; searching for a single $ in 'foo\n' will find two (empty) matches: one just before the newline, and one at the end of the string.

and

\Z
Matches only at the end of the string.

=== And now for something completely different ===

>>> import string
>>> letters = set(string.ascii_letters)
>>> ok_chars = letters | set(string.digits + "_")
>>>
>>> def is_valid_name(strg):
...     return strg and strg[0] in letters and all(c in ok_chars for c in strg)
...
>>> for test in tests:
...     print repr(test), repr(is_valid_name(test))
...
'a' True
'A' True
'a1' True
'a_1' True
'1a' False
'_a' False
'a\n' False
'' ''
'z_' True
>>>
share|improve this answer

here's a non re way

import string
flag=0
mystring="abcadsf123"
if not mystring[0] in string.digits+"_":
    for c in mystring:
       if not c in string.letters+string.digits+"-":
           flag=1
    if flag: print "%s not ok" % mystring
    else: print "%s ok" % mystring
else: print "%s starts with digits or _" % mystring
share|improve this answer
    
(1) The questioner didn't say he wanted locale-dependent results; he said he wanted [a-zA-Z], so use string.ascii_letters (2) crashes if input is "" (3) the flag thing is horrid –  John Machin Feb 23 '10 at 15:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.