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I've written a simple Haskell program to solve a puzzle. The algorithm is correct and it produces the correct result for n = 40, which is 14466. However, for n = 100 the program gets so slow that I haven't even been patient enough to wait it out.

I don't understand why it's so slow, since I would expect it to cache all the results for the intermediate function calls, you know, with Haskell being a lazy language and all.

My Compiler is GHCi 7.6.3.

I've tried profiling, but this just tells me that 99.9% of the time is spent in the isLoosing function.

isLoosing :: Int -> Int -> Bool
isLoosing x y
    | y < x             = isLoosing y x
    | x == 0            = True
    | x == 1            = False
    | y `mod` x == 0    = False
    | otherwise         = and [ not (isLoosing (y-x*m) x) |
                                m <- [1..(y `div` x)] ]

loosingSum :: Int -> Int
loosingSum n = sum  [ x + y |
                        x <- [1..(n-1)],
                        y <- [(x+1)..n],
                        isLoosing x y == True ]

main = print $ loosingSum 40
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marked as duplicate by Eric, bheklilr, Sibi, amalloy, Donal Fellows Apr 19 at 22:12

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1  
Hmm, okay, interesting. One thing I don't understand though is why does the compiler not automatically do this? –  popovitsj Apr 19 at 15:23
3  
@popovitsj GHC never memoizes since it takes far too much memory if every function call was saved. –  jozefg Apr 19 at 15:29
1  
Show your C++ solution. You might be comparing apples to oranges. –  is7s Apr 19 at 17:14
    
You may be right about that... I added the C++ code to my answer. –  popovitsj Apr 19 at 17:18

1 Answer 1

I found out that one needs to use memoization to speed this up. I found a nice library to do this for me, like below. This code now runs in 0.12s, but unfortunately, this is still way too slow. Running it with n = 10000 is again taking pretty much infinate time, while this takes a couple of seconds with a comparable algorithm in C++. So I'm starting to think maybe Haskell isn't the solution to everything...

import Data.MemoCombinators (memo2,integral)

bigN :: Int
bigN = 100

isLoosingCached = memo2 integral integral isLoosing

isLoosing :: Int -> Int -> Bool
isLoosing x y
    | y < x             = isLoosingCached y x
    | x == 0            = True
    | x == 1            = False
    | y `mod` x == 0    = False
    | otherwise         = and [ not (isLoosingCached (y-x*m) x) |
                            m <- [1..(y `div` x)] ]

loosingSum :: Int
loosingSum = sum    [ x + y |
                        x <- [1..(n-1)],
                        y <- [(x+1)..n],
                        isLoosingCached x y == True ]
                where n = bigN

main = print $ loosingSum

This solution is C++ is like this. The biggest difference is it uses iteration rather than recursion.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdint.h>
#define N 10000
short STATES[N + 1][N + 1];
using namespace std;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    uint64_t sum = 0;
    for (int y = 0; y <= N; y++)
    {
        STATES[0][y] = 1;
        STATES[1][y] = -1;
    }
    for (int x = 2; x < N; x++)
    for (int y = x; y <= N; y += x)
        STATES[x][y] = -1;
    for (int x = 2; x < N; x++)
    for (int y = x + 1; y <= N; y++)
    {
        if (STATES[x][y] == 0)
        {
            int k;
            for (int y_ = y - x; y_ > 0; y_ -= x)
            {
                if (y_ > x)
                    k = STATES[x][y_] * -1;
                else
                    k = STATES[y_][x] * -1;
                if (k == -1)
                    break;
            }
            STATES[x][y] = k;
        }
        if (STATES[x][y] == 1)
            sum += x + y;
    }
    cout << sum << endl;
    system("pause");
}
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4  
"So I'm starting to think maybe Haskell isn't the solution to everything": BLASPHEMER! –  Eric Apr 19 at 16:56
3  
The biggest difference is that the C code pre-allocates a single array, but the haskell code constantly allocates new cons cells. That is, you're comparing two entirely different algorithms. –  Carl Apr 19 at 17:50

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