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I am trying to implement a singleton which contains an NSMutableArray* what I've done so far is below.

Singleton.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Singleton : NSObject{
    NSMutableArray* ClassArray;
}

@property NSMutableArray* ClassArray;
+(Singleton*) getInstance;



- (void) SetClassArray:(NSMutableArray *)InputClassArray;
- (NSMutableArray*) GetClassArray;

Singleton.m

#import "Singleton.h"

@implementation Singleton

@synthesize ClassArray;

static Singleton *singletonInstance;

+ (Singleton*)getInstance{
    if (singletonInstance == nil) {
        singletonInstance = [[super alloc] init];
    }
    return singletonInstance;
}

- (void) SetClassArray:(NSMutableArray *)InputClassArray{
    ClassArray = InputClassArray;
}

- (NSMutableArray*) GetClassArray{
    return ClassArray;
}
@end

what I'm wondering is where does [[NSMutableArray alloc]init]; go? or do i not need it. Also when ClassArray is initialised i want some default values, (the return from another function,[DatabaseFunctions GetClassDefaultArray] ) again where does this go?. I'm assuming the line below singletonInstance = [[super alloc] init]; however it doesn't accept ClassArray.

I have an application consisting of four view controllers, what I need is an nsmutablearray that can be accessed and written to from any of these views. There are three others in total. Thanks

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1  
FYI - please find a modern tutorial or modern code to emulate. Your posted code is very out of date. Get rid of the ClassArray ivar and get rid of the @synthesize line. Neither is needed anymore. And if you do want an ivar, don't put it in the .h file. And please use standard naming conventions. Class names begin with uppercase letters. Method and variables names should begin with lowercase letters. – rmaddy Apr 19 '14 at 23:10
1  
Why do you call [[super alloc] init]? It should be [[self alloc] init] or simply [[Singleton alloc] init]. You should also look at using dispatch_once for singletons instead of checking to see if singletonInstance is nil. – rmaddy Apr 19 '14 at 23:15
    
is it possible you can send me a modern tutorial for singletons, having a google I'm not sure which is old/new proper way of doing it etc. – user1603332 Apr 20 '14 at 8:09

Just do it in the regular init method of your Singleton class.

 - (id) init {
      self = [super init];
      if (self != nil) {
        // initializations go here.
      }
      return self;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
if i initialise it in view one, then move to a new view (both different view controllers) will view2 be able to access it? – user1603332 Apr 19 '14 at 22:52
    
Do you mean your singleton instance with 'it'? If so, then yes, you are able to access it everywhere you include your Singleton header file. Or do you mean something different? – DAXaholic Apr 19 '14 at 22:55

I'm wondering is where does [[NSMutableArray alloc]init]; go? or do i not need it

That depends on what you expect in your getter. Is reasonable for your use case to return nil in GetClassArray?

You could guard against it by returning an empty array if it is nil:

- (NSMutableArray*) GetClassArray{
    if ( ! ClassArray ) {
        ClassArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    }

    return ClassArray;
}

i want some default values

You can populate your array as you see fit whenever you want, the best place to start would probably be your init method:

+ (Singleton*)getInstance{
    if (singletonInstance == nil) {
        singletonInstance = [[super alloc] init];
        NSMutableArray *array = ...;
        [singletoneinstance SetClassArray:array];
    }
    return singletonInstance;
}

As a side note, I would recommend reading up on some naming conventions so you don't mixed up between class names and variable names in the future.

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