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I am trying to set sql_mode in mysql but it throws an error.

Command:

set global sql_mode='NO_BACKSLASH_ESCAPES','STRICT_TRANS_TABLE','NO_AUTO_CREATE_USER','NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION'

Is this not the proper way to set multiple modes? What are the advantages of setting session and global modes? which is preffered? I have different users trying to update the database with different UNC values and insted od setting the session mode to 'NO_BACKSLASH_ESCAPES', I though it would make sense to et a gloabl mode for this. Does this make sense?

Please let me know.

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I resolved it.

the correct mode is :

set global sql_mode="NO_BACKSLASH_ESCAPES,STRICT_TRANS_TABLE,NO_AUTO_CREATE_USER,NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION"
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WARNING: In our experience this does not retain the setting after a MySQL restart... –  Chadwick Meyer Sep 29 at 15:25

BTW, if you set the globals in MySQL:

SET GLOBAL sql_mode = 'NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION';
SET SESSION sql_mode = 'NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION';

This will not set it PERMANENTLY, and it will revert after every restart.

So you should set this in your config file (e.g. /etc/mysql/my.cnf in the [mysqld] section), so that the changes remain in effect after a MySQL restart:

Config File: /etc/mysql/my.cnf

[mysqld] 
sql_mode = NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION,STRICT_TRANS_TABLE

Reference the MySQL Docs

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