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I am building a DirectX game, in which I have a Debug::Log static function defined in the Debug class. This just prints the values of the passed parameter on the output/console. I want to implement a function where I can pass a starting pointer to the array(that I want to print), and print all elements in the array. However I want to let the function be flexible with the type of params passed. So, I am doing something like this..

static void DebugArray(void* pointerToArray) {
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << "\n";

    void *i = pointerToArray;
    int k = 0;
    while(i) {
        ss << i; //This is how I am storing the array's elements
        i++; //Error in VS 2012 expression must be a pointer to a complete object type  

    }
    print(ss.str());
}

Is this is valid way of doing the intended work? How should I approach this? Any suggestions

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See the accepted answer to this question: Void pointer arithmetic –  Frxstrem Apr 19 at 23:18
    
Unless you are always dealing with strings, won't this just overflow and segfault? –  Casper Beyer Apr 19 at 23:24
    
Can you give an example of how the array data is set up and how you call this function? –  Matt McNabb Apr 20 at 5:59

1 Answer 1

Type needs to be known at compile time, so you'll need to use a template instead.

template <class T>
static void DebugArray(T* pointerToArray) {
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << "\n";

    T *i = pointerToArray;
    int k = 0;
    while(i) {
        ss << *i; //This is how I am storing the array's elements
        i++; //Error in VS 2012 expression must be a pointer to a complete object type  

    }
    print(ss.str());
}
share|improve this answer
    
sounds good. Let me give this a try! :) –  user3533436 Apr 19 at 23:22
    
ss << i just stores the pointer value. It does not access the objects being pointed-to (unless T is char ; std::ostream has an overload for char which reads a string from the pointed-to space) –  Matt McNabb Apr 20 at 5:57
    
Also, while(i) will always be true and you will run off the end of your array and into la-la land –  Matt McNabb Apr 20 at 5:58
    
Thanks @mattmcnabb, added dereference of the array element. It's always possible that the array referred to is null terminated. I just modified the ops code to work as they'd written it. They need to figure out how to stop price ting elements. –  Matt Apr 20 at 14:10
    
Even if the array is null-terminated, while(i) never terminates , incrementing a non-null pointer never makes it null. You could try while(*i) but we don't know if T has a conversion to bool. Hopefully OP can clarify . –  Matt McNabb Apr 20 at 14:43

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