Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have an old application written in C++ which I am porting to Ruby.

One section of the code uses execl(), in order to replace the process with a[n updated] copy of itself while maintaining open file descriptors (this application is a network service).

  if ( execl( "./my-app", "-restart", fd.c_str(), NULL ) < 0 ) {

Didn't take long to figure out that Ruby has no execl() equivalent, but that you can fake it in part using Process::spawn and the :close_others option. Or, at least I should be able to according to the documentation:

file descriptor inheritance: close non-redirected non-standard fds (3, 4, 5, ...) or not :close_others => true : don't inherit

So, it seems to me that the following should spawn a new process which has access to all open file descriptors of the parent:

server_fd = @server.to_i
env = {
  "APP_REBOOT"    => "true",
  "APP_SERVER_FD" => server_fd.to_s,
}
command = "ruby my-app.rb"
options = {
  :in           => :in,
  :out          => :out,
  :err          => :err,
  :close_others => false,
}
pid = Process.spawn env, command, options
Process.detach pid

Which will allow the child access to the descriptors... however I cannot figure out how to exit the parent process without closing all the descriptors. In other words, if I cause the parent to exit at the end of the code:

server_fd = @server.to_i
env = {
  "APP_REBOOT"    => "true",
  "APP_SERVER_FD" => server_fd.to_s,
}
command = "ruby my-app.rb"
options = {
  :in           => :in,
  :out          => :out,
  :err          => :err,
  :close_others => false,
}
pid = Process.spawn env, command, options
Process.detach pid
exit # ADDED THIS LINE

Then the descriptors are also closed for the child.

I have a feeling this is more a problem with my approach to process management than something specific to Ruby but I don't see what I'm doing wrong.


$ ruby -v
ruby 2.1.0p0 (2013-12-25 revision 44422) [x86_64-linux]

EDIT1 Just before my call to Process.spawn (or Process.exec as @mata points out) I have a diagnostic output:

system 'lsof -c ruby'

And another call to that just inside my recover_from_reboot method. This is the tail of output pre-reboot, you can see the listening server port and a connected client on the last two lines:

ruby    8957 chris    0u   CHR    136,1      0t0        4 /dev/pts/1
ruby    8957 chris    1u   CHR    136,1      0t0        4 /dev/pts/1
ruby    8957 chris    2u   CHR    136,1      0t0        4 /dev/pts/1
ruby    8957 chris    3r  FIFO      0,8      0t0 12213372 pipe
ruby    8957 chris    4w  FIFO      0,8      0t0 12213372 pipe
ruby    8957 chris    5r  FIFO      0,8      0t0 12213373 pipe
ruby    8957 chris    6w  FIFO      0,8      0t0 12213373 pipe
ruby    8957 chris    7u  IPv4 12213374      0t0      TCP localhost.localdomain:boks-servc (LISTEN)
ruby    8957 chris    8u  IPv4 12213423      0t0      TCP localhost.localdomain:boks-servc->localhost.localdomain:45249 (ESTABLISHED)

And this is what I see post-reboot:

ruby    8957 chris    3r  FIFO    0,8      0t0 12203947 pipe
ruby    8957 chris    4w  FIFO    0,8      0t0 12203947 pipe
ruby    8957 chris    5r  FIFO    0,8      0t0 12203948 pipe
ruby    8957 chris    6w  FIFO    0,8      0t0 12203948 pipe

Again this is whether I try spawn or exec.


EDIT2 Given my diagnostic output, I see that the server keeps binding to fd 7, and the client to 8. By adding

7 => 7,
8 => 8,

to my options array, I am able to successfully persist these sockets across reboot using exec. It is feasible for me to manually add the server and [client1, client2,...] fds to the options hash, but this seems very dirty when :close_others is supposed to do the heavy lifting for me.

share|improve this question
1  
why not just use exec? It does everything that execl does in C... – mata Apr 20 '14 at 0:13
    
Good call @mata, unfortunately I still see the same results. – Chris Tonkinson Apr 20 '14 at 0:29
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This certainly isn't the solution I was looking for, but in the absence of any revelations about the :close_options Hash and Process.spawn or Process.exec, I wound up manually adding all the file descriptors I cared about to the options array, which did the trick:

server_fd  = self.server.to_i
client_fds = self.clients.map { |c| c.get_fd }
env = {
  "APP_REBOOT"     => "true",
  "APP_SERVER_FD"  => server_fd.to_s,
  "APP_CLIENT_FDS" => Marshal.dump(client_fds),
}
options = {
  :in           => :in,
  :out          => :out,
  :err          => :err,
  :close_others => false,
}
# Add the server socket to the options Hash.
options[server_fd] = server_fd
# Add all the client sockets to the options Hash.
@clients.each { |c| options[c.get_fd] = c.get_fd }
# Begin anew.
Process.exec env, App.binary.to_s, options

I'll leave this answer unaccepted for a while, in case anyone comes along to set the record straight.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.