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I have reached a point of confusion when I was researching this topic...

I have read this fixed-length text file and write it to a disconnected recordset in C#. I'm following something like this example:

public static Recordset CreateDisconnectedRecordset()
{
    var rs = new Recordset(); // Create new recordset

    // Add some updatable fields
    rs.Fields.Append(
        "name", 
        DataTypeEnum.adVarChar, 
        20, 
        FieldAttributeEnum.adFldUpdatable, 
        Missing.Value);

    rs.Fields.Append(
        "country", 
        DataTypeEnum.adVarChar, 
        20, 
        FieldAttributeEnum.adFldUpdatable, 
        Missing.Value);

    rs.Open(
        Missing.Value, 
        Missing.Value, 
        CursorTypeEnum.adOpenUnspecified, 
        LockTypeEnum.adLockUnspecified, 
        0);

    // Add data
    rs.AddNew(Missing.Value, Missing.Value);
    rs.Fields["name"].Value = "Anders";
    rs.Fields["country"].Value = "Sweden";
    rs.Update(Missing.Value, Missing.Value);

    return rs;
}

While using ADODB 2.7 and System.Reflection.

I would load a file from using the open file dialog and have it pass through here. The fields parts would have the values replaced with the string that contains each line that the streamreader has read from the file when I open it.

I also tried splitting up the creation and opening/writing process into two classes (opening the recordset would be derived.) But this is just outright unfriendly to what I do...

I also figured that there would be no need for a connection because it's reading from a text file, not CSV or a database file. Every other example I see seems to require a connection to somewhere, why I don't know...

Is there any way to actually write into a recordset with just a TXT file? Or do I have to do a few other things to actually write into it?

And if anyone asks: This is a file that came from a legacy system that was moved to text format. I can't use a more modern approach.

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